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THE FINEST THINGS IN COLLEGE 
Creations Come From 

THE COLLEGE BOOK 
STORE 

We are in a Position to Assist You with 
GIFT SUGGESTIONS 

HOW IT ABORIGINATED 

The painted savage with an awful scowl upon his bedaubed 
countenance let out a terrifying warwhoop that spell-bound with 
horror his unsuspecting victim. While thus, spell-bound the 
Indian transfixed him with a barbed arrow. 

As a savage bent above his expiring victim, he grumbled 
satisfiedly to himself: 

"All you need is a dart and a holler," 

Which proves again that the painted Indian on the warpath 
was the original red, cross man. 



tration. 



WHO — WHOING THE GODS 

Teacher — Who was Mars? 

Johnny Uptadait — Secretary of war in Jupiter's adminis- 



Ladies' and Gents 
Furnishings 



KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Student's Discount 
Packard and Am 
erican Lady 

SHOES 
Arrow Collars 
and 
SHIRTS 



"Say it with 

Flowers" 
The Flower 
Shop 

19-21 North Eighth St. 
NURSERIES: 

Front and Maple Sts. 
Bell Phone 

LEBANON, PA. 



Satisfy 
Yourself 

Eat Burdan's Ice 
lOream alt jthe 

Ideal 
Restaurant 

I. H. ROEMIG 
Ladies' Room 



Chivalry Survived 

Twice before, I had been roused from a waking nap by the blare of 
bugles; then I finally turned out to see the passing of a battalion of French 
provincial troops. Soldiers of any country and at any place are well worth 
a little sleep — even if it be the last few winks on a summer morning 
These troops had a jauntiness in passing that pleased me. 

But this morning the rattle of music heralded a file of a dozen men 
clad in white duck suits, half of them wearing red hats and sashes, half 
of them wearing blue. Four blew bugles. The eight without bugles car- 
ried lances of the true medieval pattern, with points and butts padded — 
the size of a boxing glove. 

It was the day of the fete, and anyone who is acquainted with provin- 
cial life in France knows how the fete passes from place to place at this 
season — after the manner of a circus. 

In France, it is never too early to be amused, and many others be- 
sides myself had been roused to view the passing tilters; showers of coppers 
and silver pieces fell at the feet of the modern knights. The competitors 
marched through the town soliciting contributions from the merchants 
who profit by the popularity of these water fetes. 

I followed the crowds and found the lists marked out on the Seine, 
and in the center of one of the sides was anchored the umpire's stand. 
The whole was brilliant with bunting. The banks were crowded with 
spectators and hundreds of small craft were lined up along the ropes, 
from which radiated laughter, hot argument and nerve-crashing music. 

Two boats detached themselves from the many about the umpire's 
stand and moved towards opposite, ends of the lists. Each boat was rowed 
by two sturdy oarsmen and in the stern of each boat was raised a platform 
on which stood a tilter, resting on his padded lance. One worse the blue 
cap and sash, the other wore the red. At the, ends of the lists the boats 
swung around and faced each other. The rival lancemen gravely saluted 
and the bugles sounded out a military charge. The boats shot forward 
towards each other and the rival bows approached at full speed. The 
lancemen made a few graceful passes in the air to limber their muscles, 
then balanced their lithe bodies on their small square platforms. One hand 
was thrown backward in the true fencing manner; the other held the 
lance, the padded butt of which was firm against his hip. The bows crossed 
and there was a rattling of wooden shafts. He in the blie cap tottered 



2 



THE CRUCIBLE 



and bent as the boats drew apart. He was just on the point of being 
thrown into the water when he took a few jig steps and leaned statu- 
esquely on his lance. _ 

The boats withdrew to the opposite ends, swung about, and With an- 
other fierce blast, bore down upon each other a second time. Again, he 
of the blue cap tottered; but this time there was no jig step, no calm pose 
upon his lance. His hands were thrown wildly upward and the lance 
was cast upon the water. For an instant the white figure hung in mid- 
air and then disappeared in the foam. The Frenchmen on the banks 
and in the barges sent up a roar of congratulation to the victor, while 
a small yacht, unnoticed, picked up the vanquished. 

On the second bout, the two knights were more evenly matched. Once, 
twice, thrice they flourished and clashed their lances, and still firm on 
iheir feet, swept on to the opposite boundaries of tne lists, where they 
turned to renew the encounter. Five, six, seven bouts passed; it was 
not until the eighth that one of the warriers toppled and fell. 

Then, these bouts being finished, the victoro faced each other, held 
their lances at rest in their left hand, and in the right, a glass of brim- 
ming red wine. Every one in the crowds uncovered and was silent in 
the solemnity of the occasion. As they passed, their glasses clinked and 
they drank their wine with what seemed a true thirst, to the toast that 
the best man wins. And so, the sport went on, bout by bout. 

The final duel was between the winner of the contest of the day and 
the champion of the fete of the previous year. The champion was hurled 
headlong into the white foam, and the laurels passed on to another. 

That night, in the little garden beneath my billet, my host and one 
of the oarsmen fought the battle again, over a bottle of red wine. AS I 
was falling asleep, and into oblivion, I heard the clinking of glasses; 
and, as the red wine flowed, the hot argument of the Frenchmen resounded 
in my ears: "Magnifique! Mais, oni, magnifique!" 

ELDRIDGE M. STUMBAUGH, '20. 



Thetis 

The moonlight fell in skimmering patches upon the bridges and canals 
of beautiful Venice. It touched the silently moving gondolas with a soft 
brightness as they threaded their graceful way thiough the city, and it 
seemed to linger upon them as if held by the low song of the' gondolas. 
,Up, up, in the clear sky, shown the stars. It was a night, of mystic beauty, 
but through the beauty there seemed to fall an all-pervading sadness. 
There was no brightness, only a few dim lights burned throughout the city 
and there was no sound except the gentle splash of the water and the 
sweet tones of the gondolas. 

In the palace of the Doge there burned one light; and the stars, looking 
in through the watdow, saw a child with feverish cheeks and tumbled 
curls, lying on a richly ornamented couch. A mother bent over the child 
and kissed him; but he lay still and only his lips moved as he said in 
a wistful tone, "O, Won't You Let Her Go Home?" And the mother 
turned away with brimming eyes. For three days and nights the child 
had lain thus, only whispering now and then those same plaintive words. 
The mother's heart was slowly 1 , breaking and she could not bear to think 
of life without her child, her little son, But there was nothing she could 
do. 

Her mind drifted back tc the time when, with joyous face and sunny 
smile ire ployed about the house or in the garden, to every one about hitn 
unconsciously giving some of his own irrestistible happiness. And at first 
he played alone. Then came that memorable day when his father oame into 



3 



the garden, leading bv the hand, a lovely child, a little girl asi sad 1 as the 
boy was joyous. And the two children played together.^ But the little 
girl grew no hannier 

And one evening he said "Mother, why did father bring Thetis to Venice? 
She had answered that Thetisl had come to be a sister to him, to play with 
him and make him happy. "But," protested the boy "she did not want to 
come, she wanted to stay with 'her mother whom she loves like I love you, 
and she says that my father's soldiers killed her father and carried her 
away to a foreign land. O, mother, is it true? And can't she go back. 
Won't father let her if I ask him? She looks so sad I can't bear it," and 
the boy had sobbed in her arms. 

But the mother knew that Thetis could not go back, that the pleas of 
the boy would avail toothing. And;. the shadow on the boy's face grew until 
it shut out the sunlight, He did not play as before and at night he lay 
awake for hours with wide eyes fixed on the silver stars. Then the fever 
had come, the fever which touched only the children, and one after an- 
v,~ri drooped and died. And the boy had fallen sick but he was 
so strong that at first .there seemed no reason for sorrow. Even the great 
men of medicine had said he would recover. But as the days passed he 
only grew weaker and now the greatest man of all had said that it was 
not the; fever, but the boy's mind which would not let him get well. "If 
the sorrow in his heart can be cured, he will live, if not . . ." The 
words beat upon the mother's soul. She knew that it was the sorrow of 
another which lay on his heart, the sorrow of the little girl who was even 
now preparing to return to her native Hand, for the Doge had at last, pro- 
cured information concerning Thetis' mother and had arranged to return 
the child to her. But the boy could not understand, he would never know; 
and the mother, blind with tears, looked out upon the beauty of the night. 

There was a star, and turning, the mother saw the little girl sitting 
by the couch, pushing back the golden curls and stroking the white fore- 
head of the boy, and as she watched the boy called "Thetis, Thetis." A sweet 
voice answered, "Here I am, don't you know me. Then came a sigh, "Won't 
they let you go back?" And again the sweet voice spoke, "Yes, yes, I'm 
goihg as soon as' there is a ship, but I can't bear to go till you are well." 
The boy's eyes opened for a moment, and he smiled, then with one arm 
outline fno" the rt'^or eir»tiT«^-T>«r Hfcti* girl, he fell asleep. And the 
mother knew that she need not think of life without her child; while out- 
side a solemn joy replaced the sadness of the moonlight. 

KATHERINE STINE, '23. 



Scientific Society 

The Scientific -'Society held its regular meeting Tuesday evening, Janu- 
ary 13th. The program was particularly interesting but the attendance 
marred by other numerous activities. 

Mr. Kleinfelter spoke in an able manner on "The History of the 
Streptococcus," followed by Miss Miller, who gave a very interesting paper 
on "The Development of the Study of Science' in American Public Schools." 

Next meeting, February 3rd. Everybody invited. 



Students and friends of Lebanon Valley greatly regret the absence of 
Dr. Gossard since Christmas vacation because of illness. Latest reports 
show his condition much improved and it is hoped he will soon be able to 
return to his duties. 



4 



THE CRUCIBLE 




THE CRUCIBLE 

VoT~VIIL Annville, Pa., Thursday, Jan. 15, 1920. No. 7. 



Editor in Chief 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '20. 

Associate Editors 
IDA BOMBERGER, '21. 
GRIN J. FARRELL, '21. 
B. F. EMENHEISER, '21. 



Literary 
OLIVE E. DARLING, '21. 
RHODES STABLEY, '22 Ass't. 

Activities 
VERNA E. MUTCH, '20. 
HAROLD LUTZ, '23 Ass't. 



Athletics 

F. DOUGLAS BEIDEL, '20. 
GASTON VANDENBOSCH, '23, Ass't 
Alumni Editor 
CARROLL DAUGHERTY, '21. 
Music Editor, 
WILLIAM HERRING, '20. 



Business Managers 
CHARLES C. HARTMiAN, '20. 
Assistants 
ELWOOD HEISS, '21. 
GEORGE HOHL. '23. 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23. 
RODNEY KREIDER, '22. 
Entered as second class matter, November 12, 1910, at the Postoffice 
at Annville, Pa., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single copies, 15c each. 
Address all business communications to Charles Hartman, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. Items for publication are solicited from stu- 
dents and alumni, and should be in the editor's hands before the first 
and third Monday of each monti*-. 



Since the last issue of The Crucible, students at Lebanon Valley have 
enjoyed their Christmas vacations, with its relaxation from student worries 
and troubles. They have returned to school to find Semester examinations 
looming on the near horizon; and to many the prospect is sufficiently 
formidable to remove all memories of a pleasant vacation. 

It may be too late, to give counsel for the completion of the work of 
this Semester; it surely is too late to advise a set of New Year's resolu- 
tions to the tardy student; but a more oppoi'tuue time could not be found 
for the dropping of a word in regard to the second half of this year's 
work. 

With the latter half of the second Semester comes Spring with its 
insistent call, — away from books and laboratories. The wise student will 



THE CRUCIBLE 



5 



do well to reverse the; old adage' of "Making Hay While the Sun Shines" 
by reaping his crops of laboratory work and early Semester exams, while 
the weather is of a nature to encourage such labours so that with the com. 
ing of Spring and her sunshine he may be- in a position to play. 

New Year's resolutions may be too late but sincere resolutions for the 
new Semester are not loo late. Think it over and decide whether you 
would not profit by several such resolutions. 




ILLUSTRATED LECTURE BY NATIVE HINDU 

On Saturday evening, Jan. 24, 1920, at 8 o'clock, we will have the 
pleasure of having with us a Hindu, a graduate of Bombay University, 
India, Prof. N. K. Dhalwani, Hindu lecturer and entertainer. Prof. Dhal- 
wani will lecture to us on the subject, "Educational, Intellectual and Social 
India." In illustrating his address he will: 

1. Eat soup with his fingers. 

2. Wrap a big turban around his head. 

3. Speak in different Hindu languages. 

4. Give Hindu oration. 

5. Sing Hindu Songs with (Hindu) musical instrument accompani- 
ment. 

This lecture is under direction of College Y. M. C. A. Please come 
and bring your friends. 



SHAKESPEAREAN RECITAL 

President Southwick, of Emerson College of Oratory, will give a lec- 
ture-recital on "Twelfth Night," under the auspices of the Clionian Lit- 
erary Society. 

President Southwick was here years ago and was very enthusiastically 
received. All lovers of Shakespear will welcome this opportunity of hear- 
ing one of the best interpreters of the famous dramatist. 

The recital will be given in chapel on Friday, January 30th. The Clio 
girls will have charge of the sale of tickets. All seats will be reserved 
and the price of admission is 50c. 



Sophomore Class Party 

The boys of the Sophomore Class held an informal party in honor of 
the bonnie lassies of twenty-two, Monday night, January 5th, in the Moose 
Hall, Lebanon. 

Almost all members of the jolly crew were present and all had a right 
jolly good time. After the greetings and a thousand wishes for the New 
Year had re-echoed through the hall, the company sat down to lunch. 
The light repast over, a snappy full-of-pep program followed. The toast- 
master, R. Stabley, made a few opening greetings and introduced the 
various toastmasters. Meyer Herr gave a short resume of the Sophomore 
Class from the time of its inception. The next orator, Jay Arnold, gave 
a live talk on "Our Future," and each one of us was filled with pride to 
realize that so much lay in wait for us in "the time to come." A read- 
ing by Pearl Seitz was greatly enjoyed, and brought forth peals of applause. 
Josephine Stine certainly complimented the boys of '22 in her short, sweet 
talk on "Our Boys." Russell Shadel, the president of the class, presented 
a fine talk on "Our New Year's Resolutions" — the most important of 
which was "Resolved to study more and socialize less." 

To our right honorable chaperones, Prof, and Mrs. Sheldon, was given 
the distinction of closing the declamatory part of the program. 



6 ^ THE CRUCIBLE 

Freshmen Banquet 

Unmolested by the Sophmores and untroubled- by any Wle^toss, 
the members of the class of 1923 on the evening of January 5th,. brought 
Seir Christmas vacation to a merry end with a banquet m one of the 
banquet parlors of the beautiful Penn-Harris Hotel m Harrisburg. Ar- 
riving by ones and twos on nearly every train which pulled into the sta- 
tion of the capital during the day, the Freshman classmen assembled at 
7.30 o'clock at the hotel and entered the banquet parlor, headed; hy Prof, 
and Mrs. T. B. Beatty, the chaperDnes. 

An elaborate and delirious fef-t. Pw^ited the members of tbe class 
in the spacious) parlor, which was artistically decorated with pennants and 
dreamers of Blue and White. Dishes to satisfy the most epicurean ap- 
nr-te^, orchestral music to delight the most fastidious ears and toasts and 
readings to entertain the most sanctimonious hning« — fll t**«e t+« 
man had in abundance and with these they made merry until a late' hour. 

With George O. Hohl as toastmaster, this program was given: "The 
Class What It Has Been, What It Is, What *Xt Will Be," President Lester 
Williard; "Our Faculty," Vice-President Lucile Shenk; reading, Secretary 
Helen Hughes; Vocal Solo, Treasurer Ralph Shader; Reading, Miss Alta 
Bortz. Snappy and spicy impromptu speeches, in wlhich every member of 
the class participated and which were interspersed with readings by Prof. 
Beatty and special selections by the orchestra, followed the program. 

Pr/ior to this the Freshmen had enjoyed to the full several courses 
of tasty viands, which included tbe following: Oysters, cm half shell; 
celery, olives, roast chicken with dressing, candied yams, green peas, 
Romaine salad, Thousand Island Dressing, Neapolitan ice cream, cakes, 
coffee. 

The singing of "Alma Mater" brought the banquet to an end and a 
large truck conveyed the merry-making, singing and shouting Freshmen 
down the highway from home and pleasure back to school and study. Just 
as the clock of the administration building pealed out the hour of two, 
Freshmen couples plodded up the campus paths, sleepy, it is true, but 
still as happy and snappy and fresh as ever. 

Second Monthly Recital 

Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music held its- second month- 
ly recital class, Wednesday, December 17, 1919. The program was as 
follows : 

1. Piano — "Five Elise" Beethoven 

MISS VERNA PELL 

2. Piano — "Chattering Birds" Townsend 

MISS ELIZABETH FARNSLOR 

3. Organ — "Fantasde" Strainee 

MISS RUTH HOFFMAN 

4. Piano — "Moonlight Barcarolle" Schytte 

MR. IRA RUTH 

5. Violin — "Melodies from 111 Trovatore" Verdi 

MISS VIRGINIA GILPIN 

6. Piano — "Jumping Jack" 

MR. RALPH BENDER 

7. Piano — "Song of the Moonflower" F. Farrar 

MISS BLANCHE STAEGER 

8. Voice — "Serenade" '. Speaks 

MISS KATHRYN KREIDER 

9. Organ — Reverie" Dethier 

MISS BEULAH SWARTZBAUGH 



THE CRUCIBLE 



7 



10. Violin — "Air No. 6 (Mercandante) " Daucla 

MR. ELWOOD HEISS 

11. Piano — "Soaring" Schumann 

MISS EMMA WITMEYER 

12. Ladies' Quintet — "Summer is a ConnSn' in' " Fornsete 

CLASS IN MUSICAL HISTORY. 
One of the interesting features of the Ladies' Quintet sung by the 
class in Musical History. This song illustrated the Polyphonic style of 
music which orginated between 1225 and 1240. The theme or subject 
is a joyous 1 flowing melody sung a'n strict imitation. Mrs. Sheldoni kindly 
requested the audience to note how often that joyous flowing melody would 
appear during the performance of the piece. She received quite a few 
pncn^oT-t,, hut r>one found to be correct. However, after repeating the song 
the right number was ascertained by several of the Music Students. 



Scottish atmosphere pervaded the Clio program held last Friday, Jan. 
9th. The program centered around "Robert Burns." After a pleasing 
solo by Minerva Raab, Bessie Behney introduced us to the facts concerning 
the poet's life. Next we saw Burns as a "Song Writer" through a paper 
read by Elenore Shaeffer. Miriam Cassel, in a clever way gave us a criti- 
cal study of Burns. In a delightful way, Kathryn Hummelbaugh read two 
r>n«™~ h-" Burns. The program closed by singing several songs written 
by this poet. 



KALO 

The extempore program with which Kalo started the New Year proved 
to be very interesting. It may well be called a success from start to finish. 

The various numbers called for were of a helpful variety and were 
rendered by the impromptu participants in such a manner as to make 
them instructive as well as entertaining. 

The program was begun by Maria D'Addario with a "short story" full 
of wit. and humor. Paul Basehore gave some enlightening facts about his 
"best girl." A piano solo by Wm. Werner, rendered in a beautiful manner 
with technical skill, was thoroughly enjoyed. 

A discussion on "The Spoon is More Essential to the Maid than the 
Pitcher," was expounded with conviction by Beidel and Kleinfelter. They 
clearly emphasized some helpful facts. Raymond Oberholtzer favored the 
society with a short talk about his "vacation memories." Gastor Vanden- 
bosch showed unusual talent in a reading which everyone enjoyed. Some 
"Dutch Wit" was displayed by Ammon Haas. It was of an unusual type, 
to say the least. 



PHILO 

The outstanding feature of Philo's program on Jan. 9th was the "De- 
mobilization of the Service Flag," by Prof. Gingrich. With dignified elo- 
quence well suited to the occasion, he proclaimed the praises of the Philos 
who fought in the recent war, and eulogized those who paid the supreme 
sacrifice "that government of the people, by the people, and for the people 
shall not perish from the earth." He closed his speech with the valuable 
suggestion that a roll of honor be framed to their memory. 

The debate was more interesting than usual. Messrs. Nitrauer and 
Hastings brought forward abundant evidence to prove that "Those Intend- 
ing to Take Up Technical Vocations/ Should First Take Up a Course in the 
Liberal Arts," while Messrs. Horine and Farrell eloquently denied that it 
should not be so. The victory fell to the negative. 

A quartet of lusty voices added no little spice to the session. The 
editor was "there with the goods," as usual. J. Arnold presented "A 
New Year's Resolution" that will be profitable to all who will carry it out. 



8 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Inter-Class Basket Ball 

The inter-class basket ball contests will be played at 6:30 P. M. on 
the following dates: 



Jan. 


12- 


—1922 


vs. 


1923 


Jan. 


8— 


-1920 


vs. 


1921 


Jan. 


19- 


—1921 


vs. 


1923 


Jan. 


15— 


-1920 


vs. 


1922 


Jan. 


26- 


—1920 


vs. 


1923 


Jan. 


22— 


-1921 


vs. 


1922 


Feb. 


2- 


—1922 


vs. 


1923 


Jan. 


29— 


1920 


vs. 


1921 


Feb. 


9- 


—1921 


vs. 


1922 


Feb. 


5— 


-1921 


vs. 


1923 


Feb. 


16- 


—1920 


vs. 


1923 


Feb. 


12— 


-1920 


vs. 


1922 


Feb. 


23- 


—1920 


vs. 


1921 


Feb. 


19— 


-1922 


vs. 


1923 


Mar. 


1 


—1920 


vs. 


1922 


Feb. 


26— 


-1921 


vs. 


1923 


Mar. 


8 


—1920 


vs. 


1923 


Mar. 


4— 


-1921 


vs. 


1922 



The first of these contests was played last Thursday between the 
Seniors and Juniors, the Juniors winning by the score of 15 to 11. The 
game was well played and hotly contested throughout. At the end of the 
first half the Seniors led by a 7-5 score, but the Juniors came back with 
a rush the second half and at the end of that half the score was tie — ll-l I. 
In an extra five minute period the Juniors caged two pretty field goals, win- 
ning 15 to 11. 

The Freshmen-Sophomore game played Monday, Jan. 12th, was one 
of the most interesting inter-class contests staged about college for some 
time. The first year men having suffered defeats in both the tug-of-war 
and the foot ball game, started the battle determined to win. The Sophs 
put up a plucky game in order to win. When the final whistle blew 
the Freshmen were on the long end of a 28 to 26 score. 



Girls Win Two Games 

Our girls opened their basket ball season at Palmyra, December 20, 
1919, defeating the Palmyra High School girls by the score of 13 to 2. 
Throughout the game our girls outplayed their younger and inexperienced 
opponents, winning by a comfortable score. The work of Miss Fencil at 
center and that of Miss Kreider at guard were the outstanding features 
of the game. 

Another victory was gained over the Myerstown High School girls 
by the close score of 13 to 10. Although the Myerstown team put up a 
plucky fight, our team was at no time in danger of being defeated. The 
score stood 9 to 2 in our favor at the end of the first half. By snappy 
passing and brilliant shooting the Myerstown club staged a come-back 
during the last few minutes of play, which added a lot to the interest of 
the contest. 



Varsity Loses Two Games 

Our varsity suffered two defeats, both away from home. The first, 
was administered at Moravian College by the score of 43 to 21. The other 
was inflicted at Bucknell University, score 55 to 15. At Moravian our 
boys put up a good game during the first half, at the end of which Mo- 
ravian was leading by but a few points. During the second period the 
Moravian team pulled steadily into the lead, winning by a comfortable 
margin. 

At Bucknell our boys were completely outclassed by the fast university 
team. Although swept off their feet by an avalanche of field goals caged 
by the Bucknell men, our boys are credited with having put up a game 
fight until the blowing of the final whistle. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



9 



Alumni Notes 

Leroy Mackert, ex '19, captain of L. V. C.'s greatest football team in 
1916, played right tackle on the strong Maryland State team the past 
season. Such was the caliber of his playing, that he was chosen to fill 
the position of right tackle on the mythical All-Maryland team. 

Charles H. Fisher, '0 4, has been at the head of the Department of 
Education of the West Chester State Normal School for a number of years. 
At present he also occupies the position of acting Professor of Education 
at Swarthmore College. 

William C. Arnold, '03, long associated with Y. M. C. A. work, is in 
the Educational Department of the Chicago Y. M. C. A. 

Joel Wheelock, formerly of Carlisle Indian and Lebanon "Valley foot- 
ball fame, is located at the Hampton Roads Naval Base. Wheelock was 
captain of the Naval Base foot ball eleven which just closed a very suc- 
cessful season. 

William E. Herr, '05, is director of activities of the Norfolk Naval 
Base Y. M. C. A., Norfolk, Va. As Entertainment Director, Mr. Herr is 
a member of the National Council on War Work in the tidewater district 
of Virginia. 

Charles E. Roudabush, '03, has attained success in educational work. 
He is superintendent of the public schools of Minersville, Pa. As a loyal 
alumnus, Mr. Roudabush has been instrumental in directing a number 
of young people to Lebanon Valley College. 

Joseph Hollinger, '17, and Daniel Walter, '18, who entered Harvard 
this fall to take courses in business and finance, have been chosen by the 
committee on athletics at that University to coach the Freshman basket 
ball teams. The Harvard "Crimson," in which the item appeared, stated 
the fact of their being former members of the Lebanon Valley basket ball 
teams and of the Lebanon Big Five team. 

Edward H. Smith, '14, recently discharged from a captaincy in the 
United States Army, has returned to practice law in Lebanon county. Mr. 
Smith received his training in matters legal at the Dickinson Law School, 
from which he graduated in 1917. 

Professor C. C. Peters, '05, who is associate professor in the Depart- 
ment of Education of Ohio Wesleyan University, has been appointed Direc- 
tor of the Curriculum Division of the Inter-Church Survey. This Survey 
represents the first steps in a world-wide inter-church movement. The 
committee in charge of the division is composed of eminent professors of 
the Universities of Columbia, Pennsylvania, Boston and Carnegie Tech. 
In recognition of his splendid work, Prof. Peters has been chosen to head 
these men. Ohio Wesleyan has granted him leave of absence during the 
second semester, in order that his whole time be devoted to the work. 

On Dec. 30, 1919, Miss A. Louise Kreider, a music graduate in 1908 
at L. V. C, and Dr. Alfred D. Strickler, were united in wedlock at Annville 
by the college pastor, Dr. I. E. Runk, '03. Mrs. Gideon R. Kreider, '0 8, 
was matron of honor; Dr H. Malcolm Read, of York, Pa., was best man. 
Dr. Strickler has received degrees from Hahnemann College and Colum- 
bia University. As captain in the medical corps, he spent two years serv- 
ing his country in France. He and Mrs. Strickler are at present residing 
at Lebanon, where Dr. Strickler is practicing his chosen profession. 

Miss Ora Bachman, '13, is teaching music in the Middletown public 
schools. 

Miss Elizabeth Gallatin, '18, who occupies the position of professor 
of Latin and French in the high school at Romney, W. Va., spent her 
Christmas vacation with her parents at Annville, Pa. 

Paul Wagner, '17, is teaching mathematics at the Baltimore Y. M. 
C. A., in connection with the studies he is taking up at Johns Hopkins 
University. 



10 



THE CRUCIBLE 



STYLE THAT COMMENDS YOUR 
TASTE 

Good taste is the first requisite of a good impression. Seek 
style in your clothes by all means — but don't mistake "frills 
and flounceis" for smartness. 

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES 

possess style and give you poise and personality — they can't 
change your character, but they reflect taste and make other 
men welcome your society. Always all wool. 

Try our dependable store for your next suit or overcoat. 

MANUFACTURERS CLOTHING CO. 

(Style Headquarters- — The Home of Society Brand. 
725 CUMBERLAND STREET, LEBANON, PA. 



BOYER'S 

the Best Place for all kinds of 
FINE STATIONERY, BLANK 
BOOKS, LOOSE LEAF AND 
MEMO BOOKS. 

Popular 

Fiction 

Pennants and Cushion Tops. 
L. V. C. Seal Jewelry 

Kodaks and Film 

Developing and Brfinting 
Snapshot Albums 
Fountain Pens, Flash Lights, 




For Efficient ServBce Patronize 
the 

Hershey Laundry 

We are the Best Equipped. 
All work guaranteed. 
Full Dress 1 Work a Specialty. 

Stine and Strine 

AGENTS 



Photographs of 
Quality 
BLAZIER'S 
STUDIO 

LEBANON, PA. 
Help to Identify You. 



TiR E CRUCIBLE 



11 



Bowman's Model 
BAKERY 

FOR QUALITY 

Bread, -Cakes, Buns, 
Pies, Cream Puffs, 
Doughnuts and 
Crullers. 

Opposite the. Post Office, 

'A^OiJB/j 9l]fVf f • ' '-' 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



J. F. APPLE CO. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Manufacturing 
Jewelers 

Class and Fratertilty Pins 

RINGS, MEDALS PRIZE 
CUPS 

Also an Attractive Line of 
STOCK JEWELRY 



CHOICE 

CHRISTMAS AND- NEW YEAR 
GIFTS 
"HARPEL'S" 

Kodaks and Film Pictures and Frames 



AVE MAKE 

CLASS PINS AND RINGS 
Commencement Announcements 

OF QUALITY 

BASTIAN BROS. CO. 



272 BASTIAN BLDG. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



_ 



pynp '•'Of 



NEED A NEW TRUNK, BAG, SUIT 
CASE, TRAVELING CASE, 

LEATHER GOODS 
Bicycle and Sporting* Goods? 

•-*•>'•'•'•: " '"We daftly' a fine line-^gaodik-fy pV ^ T 
PRICES RIGHT QUALITY RIGHT 

E. M. HOTTENSTEIN, 

CUMBERLAND STREET LEBANON, PA. 




12 



THE CRUCIBLE 



All American Bath 
and Barber Shop 

H. M. MONFORD, Prop. 

Eagle Hotel Building, Annville 
Penna. 

Bell Phone 

Engagements by Appointment. 

Both Phones 
ASK FOR SIMON P. FEGAN'S 

Soft Drinks 

Manufactured by Simon P. 
Fegan 

536 NORTH EIGHTH ST., 
LEBANON. PA. 

Ufj PALACE of SWEETS 
" SUPERIOR QUALITY ONLY 

731 CUMBERLAND STREET 
LEBANON. PA 



Bell Phone 
SUPERFINE CHOCOLATES. 
BON BONS, CANDY AND ICE 
CREAM 

Fresh Home-Made Candies 1 and 

Ice Cream Daily 
[ce Cream and Candies made 
to order 



SAY IT WITH FLOWERS 

J. F. Vavrous Sons 

512 Cumberland St., 
LEBANON, PA. 



Harvey L. Seltzer 

One Price 

Clothier and Men's 
Furnisher 

"The House of Good Values" 

769 CUMBERLAND ST., 
LEBANON, PA. 

Annville National 
Bank 

of ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Capital Stock ....$100,000.00 
Surplus and Undivided 

Profits $175,253.00 



Umbrellas and 
Traveling Goods 

SPORTING GOODS 

E. J. Snavely & Co. 

"MARKET SQUARE" 

FINK'S BAKERY 

for the 

BEST BAKED PRODUCTS 
You Pay for the Articles 
QUALITY and SERVICE 
Cost You Nothing. 



A 



"Stetson" 
Hats 



'Interwoven' 
Hose 



The Men's Shop 

in the Hershey Dept. Store at 
HERSHEY, PA. 

New Styles in Men's Wear 

are here 
while the styles are new — 
not when they are dead. 



"Hart, Schaffner 
and Marx" 

and 
! Kirischbaum" 
Clothes 



High Grade 
CHOCOLATES 

Maillard's of New York. 

Apollo and Reymer's 
^Fiancy Gift PackaigeS : 
A Specialty 
in 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds. 
Various High Grade 
CONFECTIONS 
always fresh. 
The Store with the Candy with 
the snap. 

SHOTT'S 

The Home of Fine Candies. 
Bell 27-J. 127 N. 9th St. 



Quality Service 



BURDAN'S 
ICE CREAM 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Pottstown, Pa. 

Reading, Pa. 

Wilmington, Del. 



Quality Service 



JACOB 
SARGENT 

MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

Ready-to- 

Wear 
Clothing 



W. R. WALTZ 
Barber Shop 

WEST MAIN ST., 

Annville, Pa. 



For 
Costumes 
and Caps 
and Gowns 

Write to 

WAAS and 
Son 



LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 
Five Departments 

College, Academy, Music, Oratory 
! and Art 

Grants Bachelor of Arts, Science and Music Degrees. 



For information write 

REV. G. D. GOSSARD, D. D., Pres. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



THE 
CRUCIBLE 




Lebanon Valley Golfleg 



THE FINEST THINGS IN COLLEGE 
Creations Come From 

THE COLLEGE BOOK 
STORE 

We are in a Position to Assist You with 
GIFT SUGGESTIONS 



"THE EASIEST WAY" 

First Graduate Optician — How long did you study before 
getting your diploma? 

Second G. O. — Nearly a week. 
F. G. O. — What detained you? 



JUVENILE TERMINOLOGY 

Teacher — How do you put down a subtraction ^example, 
Eliza? 

Eliza — Why you puts down one number and 'en you puts 
down 'nother number 'nunder that'll, and you draws a stripe 
'nunder bofe of 'em. 



THE STUBBORN THING 

Plaintiff (in breach of promise suit) — He was the most per- 
sistent suitor I ever had. He simply wouldn't take yes for an 
answer. 



Ladies' and Gents 
Furnishings 



KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Student's Discount 
Packard find Am 
erican Lady 

SHOES 
Arrow Collars 
and 
SHIRTS 



"Say it with 

Flowers" 
The Flower 
Shop 

19-21 North Eighth St. 
NURSERIES: 

Front and Maple Sts. 
Bell Phone 

LEBANON, PA. 



Satisfy 
Yourself 

Eat Burdan's Ice 
ICream at jthe 

Ideal 
Restaurant 

I. H. ROEMIG 
Ladies' Room 



Ode to Mathematics 

O Science, that with numbers great art packed, 
Nor lines nor figures hast thou ever lacked, 
Thou Science of all Sciences exact, 

We sing of thee. 
Long have thy mandates been proclaimed to men, 
Long have they talked of thee by tongue and pen, 
Why ancient Egypt knew thou wast e'en then, 

A mystery. 

O Mathematics, thou art known to those 

Who robbed themselves of nights of sweet repose, 

Who in the early hours of morn arose 

To learn of thee. 
To some methinks thou art a special friend 
For whom those signs and figures always blend; 
Is it in favor thou to them dost lend 

Especially? 

To Freshmen thou a grievous burden art, 
In Schedule thou dost play the villain part, 
How deep the worry bides in every heart 

Because of thee. 
Howe'er, to Juniors thou art nobler far, 
And Seniors recognize in thee a star, 
They know how many beauties hidden are, 

They honor thee. 

O Queen of Sciences! What shall we say? 
Can words in any way thy worth display? 
The symbols of language send the answer, "Nay, 

Not easily." 
Long centuries gone give record of thy birth, 
And age on ages show thy matchless worth 
This is the greatest word for thee on earth, 

"Infinity." 

— VERNA E. MUTCH, '20. 



2 



THE CRUCIBLE 



"If I Were a Paramecium" 

If I were a Paramecium, 

I'd be a terror, you bet; 
I'd keep the students guessin' 
And the profs all in a sweat. 
There'd be another Darwin 

With a theory just on me 
And all the world of Science 

Would be simply "up a tree." 

I'd be so wee and quiet, 

Till on a crystal slide 
Beneath a tiny cover glass 

I'd see that I was spied. 
When up through massive microscope 

The teachers eye I'd see, 
I'd wiggle all my cilia 

As if to say, "Show me." 

And out from under cover glass 

I'd mighty surely come. 
To give the profs, a swimming match 

Till they had brought me home. 
And then I'd look so innocent, 

(For paramecii can), 
And they would surely think me dead, 

I'd look so sad and worn. 

And when I saw the watchful 

With pencil in his hand, 
About to draw my picture, 

I'd simply skip again. 
For I'd be sort of modest 

For a Paramecium, 
And sensitive to portraits, 

I'd never feel at home. 

I'd swallow down my gullet 

Enough to last all day. 
Then, whirling round my peristome, * 

I'd swim again away. 
My trichocysts and vacuoles 

I'd labor to distort; 
So if the teacher saw them 

He'd think he'd found my heart. 

And all the school would wild with rage 

Announce to all the world, 
A Paramecium with a heart 

That they might be first herald. 
But since this isn't possible, 

I think I'd rather be 
An awkward, bashful country boy, 

just like I am — That's me. 

CARL W. HISER, '22. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



3 




THE CRUCIBLE 

Vol. VIII. Annville, Pa., Thursday, Ma-ch 4, 1920. No. 8. 



Literary 
OLIVE E. DARLING, '21. 
RHODES STABLEY, '22 Ass't. 

Activities 

VERNA E. MUTCH, '20. 
HAROLID LUTZ, '23 Ass't 



Editor in Oliief 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '20. 

Associate Editors 
IDA BOMBERGER, '21. 
ORIN J. FARRELL, '21. 
B. F. EMENHEISER, '21. 

Athletics 

F. DOUGLAS BEIDEL, '2 0. 
GASTON VANDENBOSCH, '23, Ass't 
Alumni Editor 
CARROLL DAUGHERTY, '21. 
Music Editor, 
WILLIAM HERRING, '20. 



Business Managers 
CHARLES C. HART Mi AN, '20. 
Assistants 
EL WOOD HEISS, '21. 
GEORGE HOHL. '23. 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23. 
RODNEY KREIDER, '22. 
Entered as second class matter, November 12, 1910, at the Postoffice 
at Annville, Pa., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single copies, 15c each. 
Address all business communications to Charles Hartman, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. Items for publication are solicited from stu- 
dents and alumni, and should be in the editor's hands before the first 
and third Monday of each montx>. 



The habit of being disinterested is one of the most easily acquired 
habits of students and one of which the students at Lebanon Valley are 
not entirely innocent. It has been the purpose of THE CRUCIBLE since 
its inception to stimulate interest whenever possible, this purpose being 
fostered by faith in the idea that interest results in action, and action 
indicates growth. 

In accordance with the above idea, THE CRUCIBLE believes the time 
opportune to mention several facts which assuredly deserve the interest 
of the students in that they are essentially student problems. The first 
is that because of lack of funds, the Athletic Association has been com- 



4 



THE CRUCIBLE 



pelled to cancel part of the basket ball schedule and to curtail a large part 
of the base ball preparations. Secondly, THE CRUCIBLE, the students 
own and only publication, has been fighting a losing battle from the be- 
ginning, and expects to be compelled to close the year several months 
before commencement. Thirdly: In giving an education to any student 
Lebanon Valley pays approximately as much as does "the student. Fourthly. 
Within the past month, Lebanon Valley's student body was beguiled, 
persuaded, coaxed and driven into subscribing more than eleven hundred 
dollars to the cause of world-wide Prohibition. 

Lest we be misunderstood, we hasten to say that none of these facts 
are being criticised, particularly not the latter. World-wide Prohibition 
we regard as one of the most progressive movements of the present. But 
as we mentioned in the beginning of this article, we fear the habit of 
disinterestedness, and we present these facts in the hope they may, being 
presented in this form, in a measure stimulate thought and possibly action. 



To her subscribers and advertisers, The Crucible owes an apology for 
her non-appearance the past two weeks. The fact that misfortunes never 
come singly has been conclusively proven. In the first place, the material 
for the entire issue was lost in the mail enroute to Lebanon. After re- 
placing that material, this issue was detained because of the sickness of 
the printer. Finally, however, these difficulties have been overcome. Here- 
after it is hoped that you will receive your Crucible on time. 



Elvegrams 

How long and fierce the battle raged across a pile of books! How long 
we snarled and gave the profs, enduring loving looks! How long we 

packed away the decks and said farewell to "Rum"! How long 

we paced the campus paths with faces blue and glum! How oft we gazed 
with "tears" upon that dollar lone and last! How long we heard the 
chow bell ring, but study made us fast! How long we struggled, strug- 
gled on and swam in misery! How long a smile, a grin or two was ancient 
history! 'Twas then thot socializing took a sudden awful slump! 'Twas 
then that friendly strolls at three received a knockout bump! 'Twas then 
we racked our brains for thoughts and gave up in despair! 'Twas then 
we learned for once for all a vacuum reigns up there! 'Twas then we 
wished we had not waited long and precious days! 'Twas then we swore 
that we'd reform and change our erring ways! 'Twas then too late to 
grumble, 'Twas then too late to sigh! 'Twas then that we resigned to 
fate, we'd either do or die! 'Twas then we started in to pack our deeds 
in bags and trunk! 'Twas then we knew as sure as day that we were 
doomed to flunk! 



But stop! the clouds have broken, and the sun comes peeping through! 
It's mighty good to live again, our wildest dreams came true! Let's give 
one roaring, rousing yell, for we are free from crams! For we, heroes 
and heroines, have passed those tough exams. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



5 




Monday evening, February 24th, Lebanon Valley's debating team met 
Juniata's representatives on the question of the principle of the closed 
shop in American industry. The team from Juniata upheld the negative 
ide in such a manner that they were accorded the decision of the judges. 

This has been the first time a team from Lebanon Valley has partici- 
ated in an intercollegiate debate for years. While losers in this attempt, 
the team consisting of Kleinfelter, Horine, Arnold and Daugherty need 
not be ashamed. For an initial attempt, against men experienced in inter- 
collegiate debating, their showing was remarkably good. 

Prof. H. H. Shenk was the presiding officer for the evening. The 
judges being W. E. Schaak, Esq., Paul G. Adams, Esq., and Rev. J. N. 
LeVan. 



Glee Club Concert 

The Home Concert of the Glee Club is always anticipated with enthu- 
iasm, for we regard it as a musical treat by our "home talent." This year, 
once again, Lebanon Valley turned away after the entertainment proud 
of her gleeful sons. 

The program was divided into two parts, part one consisting of the 
usual glees and vocal and instrumental selections. The unique encores 
wer heartily enjoyed. A humorous operetta, entitled, "Captain Van Der 
Hum," was the second part. The whole performance gave evidence of 
horough preparation and that each one was master of his role. 

Th Club has just returned from a nine day trip, in which concerts 
ere given in Harrisburg, Red Lion, Dallastown, York, Millersburg, Sun- 
ury, Shamokin and Minersville. 



Philo-Clio Joint Session 

On Friday, Feb. 13th, the Philos and Clios met in Philo Hall for a 
oint session. The program rendered proved to be a very diverting enter- 
ainment. An innovation was introduced in the form of the Clio-Philo 
orchestra which furnished both the opening and closing numbers of the 
program. We are surprised to find that we had a lecturer in our midst. 
~lr. Arnold delivered an illustrated lecture describing the scenic beauties 
*f his native city, Mauch Chunk. Vocal contributions were furnished by 
Myrle Saylor and Ralph Shader. The dramatic art received due represen- 
tation in a very amusing sketch depicting a school-room scene. A most 
athetic poem entitled "Wanted, an Idea," was contributed and effectively 
ead by Virginia Smith. The Olive Branch and Living Thots added the 
pice of humor to the program. 

After the program the chairs were moved out of their formal order 
and soon were observed to be arranged in pairs or circles. In other words, 
a social hour was in order and, to foster the spirit of good cheer, refresh- 
ents of sandwiches, cakes and cocoa were served. 



6 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Inter-Class Basketball League 

The Inter-Class Basketball League is progressing at a fine rate. Spirit 
and enthusiasm runs high and there is not a little rivalry and competition 
between the four classes at L. V. C. After a hard uphill fight, including 
a winning stride of four straights, the Sophomores have been able to 
gain first place by a half game margin. The plucky Freshmen occupy 
the second berth by a safe lead and constitute the main rivals of the Sophs 
for league supremacy. The outcome of the next four important games 
will undoubtedly determine the pennant winner. As the league now stands, 
each club has four games yet to play. 

January 15th the Sophomores won their first game when they de- 
feated the Seniors in a hard-fought contest, score 23-14. Berger and Herr 
led the field in points scored individually. 

Jan. 19, the Freshmen trounced the Juniors 32 to 25. The game was 
thrilling from start to finish. Uhler and Smith played well. 

Jan. 21, the Freshmen won their third straight when they defeated 
the Seniors 17-13, on the Y. M. C. A. floor at Lebanon, Pa. 

Feb. 2, the Freshmen met defeat at the hands of the Soph warriors, 
score 2 7-2 4.1. Herr played a fine game with Risser a close runner-up. 

Feb. 5, the Sophomores won the third straight, when they took the 
Seniors into camp to the tune of 26-17. This victory gave the Sophs 
an equal claim to first place with the Freshmen. 

Feb. 9, the Sophomores won their fourth straight game, when they 
easily dubbed the Juniors 42-16. Herr was the outstanding star of the 
game, having scored 26 of his teams' 42 points. 

Feb. 12th, in the most hotly contested game so far, the Seniors 
defeated the Juniors 22-21. Both teams were seriously handicapped by 
the absence of several of their best men. Allen's field goal in the last few 
seconds of play spelled defeat for the third year men. Uhler played a 
sterling game for the Juniors, scoring 19 of his team's 21 points. 

February 16th the Juniors met their cousins, the Freshmen, in a game 
full of sensational playing. The first half the Juniors led, but in the 
second period the superior team work of the Freshies asserted itself, the 
final score being 40-29. 

February 23rd the Seniors surprised every one by trouncing the Fresh- 
men and putting the underclassmen in second place. It brought the gradu- 
ating class out of last place and put the Juniors in the cellar without an 
argument. The score was 34-27. 

Herr continues to lead all others in scoring, Uhler giving him the 
only real competition. 

Standing of the teams: 







1 


.800 




.. 4 


2 


.667 




i 2 


4 


.333 






4 


.200 




Won 


Lost 


P. C. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



7 



Girls' Varsity 

Seven games have been played since the last issue of THE CRUCIBLE, 
making a total of nine games, of which our girls have won five and lost 
four. They have defeated Palmyra High School and Camp Hill High School 
on foreign floors, Annville Junior Auxilliary, Myerstown H. S. and Harris- 
burg Central H. S. on our floor. They lost to Myerstown H. S. and P. R. R. 
of Harrisburg by one point on foreign floors, as well as Penn Hall College 
at Chambersburg by a large score, and P. R. R. girls of Harrisburg on our 
own gym floor. Gladys Fenci© continues to star with her field goals, scor- 
ing eleven against Annville. E. Smith is fast becoming a dependable foul 
goal shooter. E. Kreider can scarcely be improved upon as a standing 
guard, while J. Sebastian and D. Fencil play the floor in big league fashion 
and invariably come through with several two-pointers. 



Boys' Varsity 

Only two more games remain to be played this season, both games at 
home. Albright comes here on March 6th and Ursinus March 11th. By 
winning both of these games we will have won won eight and lost five. 
We stand a good chance of beating both these teams, as we have beaten Al- 
bright on her floor 28-24, and lost to Ursinus there 33-29, after leading most 
of the first half. Since the last issue we have triumphed over Juniata, Leba- 
non Y. M. C. A., Univ. of Penna., Jr. Varsity, Moravian College and Al- 
bright. We lost both games on the Juniata and State College trip, as well 
as the game to Ursinus. Perhaps the most important of these was the 
game at Albright, where we "nosed them out" in the last minutes of play 
in one of the fastest and best played games of the season, it being our 
rival's only defeat on their floor this year. The "Penn" Jr. Varsity game 
at Lebanon was another thriller, the outcome of the game being in doubt 
until the final whistle blew. Moore continues to score heavily from the 
field, while Harvey is just beginning to find himself. Capt. Seltzer and 
Fishburn can always be counted on coming through with several double- 
deckers. 

The scores of the games played since the last issue of THE CRUCIBLE: 



L. V. C. Opponents 

Jan. 15 — Juniata College at L. V. C 3 5 30 

Jan. 16 — Lebanon Y. M. C. A. at Lebanon 33 20 

Jan. 21 — Univ. of Penna. Jr. Varsity at Lebanon 26 23 

Jan. 23 — Moravian College at L. V. C 36 27 

Jan. 30 — Juniata College at Huntingdon 28 34 

Jan. 31 — State College at State College 12 69 

Feb. 11 — Ursinus College at Collegeville 29 33 

Feb. 21 — Albright College at Myerstown 28 24 



8 



THE CRUCIBLE 



The annual inter-class game between the Sophomores and Freshmen, 
with varsity players eligible, was one of the best played and most exciting 
of its kind played here in years. White, of Steelton, who referees our 
Varsity games, officiated and called eighty fouls, forty-eight on the Fresh- 
ies and thirty-two on the Sophs, giving the rader an idea of the spirit and 
enthusiasm which the referee had to check. The first-year men won, 
44?32, Heinle Herr scoring all the points for the Sophs with 26 fouls 
and three field goals. Harvey Shumaker and Risser starred for the 
Freshies. 

On February 6th the Junior Varsity went to Myerstown and lost to 
the Myerstown High School five by one point, the score being 27 to 26. 
The game was hotly contested, three extra periods of five minutes each 
being required to determine the victors. In this game Risser starred by 
shooting 2 4 out of 28 foul goals. Herr, Uhler, Risser, Homan, Scully and 
Beliman composed the team. 

On March 1st the S. A. T. C. Basket Ball team composed of three 
Varsity men, Fishburn, Moore and Harvey, with two players from the 
Junior Varsity, played a team of overseas men with veterans like Wine, 
Homan, Berger, Beidel, Behman, Renn and Strickler in the line-up. The 
betting was very light as the teams appeared evenly matched, with the 
S. A. T. C. team having a slight edge. The veterans of "Sunny France" 
opened up a big lead in the first twenty minutes, but were very nearly 
beaten in the closing minutes, the final whistle showing the veterans on 
the long end of a 30-29 score. Sailor Kleinfelter refereed. 



KALO MASQUERADE 

On Saturday evening, the 14th, was the annual celebration in honor 
of St. Valentine. Curious indeed were the valentines that presented them- 
selves in all sorts of fantastic designs. 

A tall, green-capped ghost with button-like eyes was chosen to lead 
the motley company up the long stairs to Kalo Hall. And there, to the 
step of martial music, this odd procession filed past the judge.s. China- 
men, Japanese, Mexicans, ancient oriental, red cross nurses, athletes, col- 
ored folks, gypsies, monks, clowns, fairies, little boys, little girls — all form- 
ed the attendants to a bride and bridesmaid who led the procession. The 
girls' prize was awarded to Topsy, whose cheeks almost burst with darkie 
glee at the sight of a handsome box of stationery. The boy's prize was 
given to Our School Boy, of six feet, gay socks, immense white gloves, 
a coat that was less than a fit, heavy tortoise shell glasses, and a hat that 
looked like a broken cork on a long-necked bottle. The prizes having been 
awarded, everyone unmasked, and the qustion marks that had filled the 
minds of the many spectators were reduced to periods. 

After several interesting contests, such as the peanut race, the um- 
brella spin, whistling trio, etc., delightful refreshments were served. It 
was with great reluctance that the crowd broke up to brave the wind, rain 
and darkness. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



9 



NEWS OF OUR ALUMNI 

Dr. Hervin U. Roop, A. M.. Ph.D., D.D., Lit.D., of the class of '92, 
has accepted a call to the presidency of York College of York, Nebraska, 
and has already entered upon active work in his new field of endeavor. 
Doctor Roop is one of the foremost educators in the United Brethren de- 
nomination. A scholar of very marked ability, he holds degrees from 
Wooster University, Wooster, Ohio, from Yale University, and from the 
University of Pennsylvania. In addition to these years of study Doctor 
Roop has been engaged in continuous educational work. Following his 
graduation from L. V. C, he spent five years teaching in the State Normal 
School at Shippensburg, Pa. From there he accepted the position of State 
Superintendent of Teacher Training Work. His exceptional work merited 
his selection as President of Lebanon Valley College During the ten years 
which he spent in this service, the college underwent a period of growth 
and development unparalleled in its former or subsequent history. A great 
building and endowment campaign was successfully staged, and the insti- 
tution was placed on a solid footing. Doctor Roop has just completed his 
twelfth equally successful year as president of Eastern College, Manassas, 
Virginia. Here, too, the school has had a marked growth under his com- 
petent leadership. Doctor Roop is a splendid financier, and a man of re- 
markable executive and administrative ability. His ability as a speaker 
and his fine social qualities in dealing with men have made him invalu- 
able as an educator. L. V. C. is indeed proud of such a man. 

S. Frank W. Morrison, '18, is teaching zoology at Midland High School, 
near Pittsburgh. "Hank" is also director of Midland's athletics, and under 
his tutelage a very successful football season was completed. 

Robert Atticks, '18, occupies the responsible position of material in- 
spector with the Pennsylvania State Highway Department. At present 
"Red" is located at Harrisburg. 

Charles H. Fisher, '04, has been rewarded for his good work as pro- 
fessor of education at the West Chester Normal School, by being offered 
a position in the State Department of Education at Harrisburg, which he 
has accepted. 

R. Walp. Williams, '17, is professor of physics and chemistry in the 
Cumberland Valley State Normal School at Shippensburg, Pa. "Rube" is 
also coach of the school's athletics. 

Merle M. Hoover, '06, has been very successful in educational work 
since his graduation from L. V. C. His first position was that of Professor 
of English at Westfield College, Westfield, Illinois. He next accepted the 
position of Head of the Department of English in the large Jersey City 
High School. During the war Prof. Hoover served his country as a "Y" 
secretary in France. Upon returning home, he took up his old duties in 
Jersey City High. 

Phares Holdeman, '11, who saw extensive service in France as army 
chaplain, is serving the United Brethren church at Elizabethville, Pa. 

Quite a few alumni are engaged in educational work in Lebanon, Pa.: 
E. M. Balsbaugh, '01, is Superintendent of the City Schools; J. Lester 
Appenzeller, '08, is principal of the High School and Head of the Depart- 
ment of History; J. W. Espenshade, '03, is Vice Principal of the High School 
and Head of the Department of Mathematics; Miss Nellie Seltzer, '12, is 
head of the Department of English; Miss Alma Light, '99, teaches history 
in the High School; J. H. Sprecher, '07, teaches Mathematics; Miss Sara 
Helm, '03, is principal of the Fairview Schools; Miss Violet Wolfe, '17, 
teaches in the Junior High School; Miss Elizabeth Woomer, '17, is teach- 
ing in the Fourth Grade. 

Mrs. Edith Freed Martz, '10, is living at West Chester, Pa., where 
Prof. Martz teaches mathematics in the State Normal School. 



10 



THE CRUCIBLE 



STYLE THAT COMMENDS YOUR 
TASTE 

Good taste is the first requisite of a good impression. Seek 

style in your clothes by all means — but don't mistake "frills 
and flounces" for smartness. 

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES 

possess style and give you poise and personality — they can't 
change your character, but they reflect taste and make other 
men welcome your society. Always all wool. 

Try our dependable store for your next suit or overcoat. 

MANUFACTURERS CLOTHING CO. 

Style Headquarters- — The Home of Society Brand. 
725 CUMBERLAND STREET, LEBANON, PA. 



For Efficient Service Patronize 
the 

Hershey Laundry 

We are the Best Equipped. 
All work guaranteed. 
Full Dress Work a Specialty. 

Stine and Strine 

AGENTS 



Photographs of 
Quality 
BLAZIER'S 
STUDIO 

LEBANON, PA. 
Help to Identify You. 



BOYER'S 

the best place for all kinds of FINE STATIONERY, 
BLANK BOOKS, LOOSE LEAF AND MEMO BOOKS. 

Popular 

FICTION 

Pennants' and Cushion Tops. L. V. C. Seal Jewelry- 

Kodaks and Film 

Developing and Printing. Snapshot Albums. 

Fountain Pens, Flash Lights, Toys, Games, 
Books, Decorations. 

19 W. Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



11 



Bowman's Model 
BAKERY 

FOR QUALITY 

Bread, Cakes, Buns, 
Pies, Cream Puffs, 
Doughnuts and 
Crullers. 

Opposite the Post Office, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



J. F. APPLE CO. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Manufacturing 
Jewelers 

Class and Fraternity Pins 

RINGS, MEDALS PRIZE 
CUPS 

Also an Attractive Line of 
STOCK JEWELRY 



CHOICE 

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR 
GIFTS 
"HARPEL'S" 

Kodaks and Film Pictures and Frames 



WE MAKE 

CLASS PINS AND RINGS 
Commencement Announcements 

OF QUALITY 

BASTIAN BROS. CO. 



272 BASTIAN BLDG. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



NEED A NEW TRUNK, BAG, SUIT 
CASE, TRAVELING CASE, 

LEATHER GOODS 
Bicycle and Sporting Goods? 

We carry a fine line of goods. 
PRICES RIGHT QUALITY RIGHT 

E. M. HOTTENSTEIN, 

CUMBERLAND STREET LEBANON, PA. 



12 



THE CRUCIBLE 



All American Bath 
and Barber Shop 

H. M. MONFORD, Prop. 

Eagle Hotel Building, Annville 
Penna. 

Bell Phone 

Engagements by Appointment. 

Both Phones 
ASK FOR SIMON P. FEGAN'S 

Soft Drinks 

Manufactured by Simon P. 
Fegan 

536 NORTH EIGHTH ST., 
LEBANON, PA. 




Bell Phone 
SUPERFINE CHOCOLATES, 
BON BONS, CANDY AND ICE 
CREAM 

Fresh Home-Made Candies and 

Ice Cream Daily 
Ice Cream and Candies made 
to order 



SAY IT WITH FLOWERS 

J. F. Vavrous Sons 

512 Cumberland St., 
LEBANON, PA. 



Harvey L. Seltzer 

One Price 

Clothier and Men's 
Furnisher 

"The House of Good Values" 

769 CUMBERLAND ST., 
LEBANON, PA. 

Annville National 
Bank 

of ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided 

Profits $175,253.00 



Umbrellas and 
Traveling Goods 

SPORTING GOODS 

E. J. Snavely & Co. 

"MARKET SQUARE" 

FINK'S BAKERY 

for the 

BEST BAKED PRODUCTS 
You Pay for the Articles 
QUALITY and SERVICE 
Cost You Nothing. 



"Stetson" 
Hats 



'Interwoven' 
Hose 



The Men's Shop 

in the Hershey Dept. Stove at 
HERSHEY, PA. 

New Styles in Men's Wear 

are here 
while the styles are dcw — 
not when they are dead. 



"Hart, Schaffner 
and Marx" 
and 

"Kirschbaum" 
Clothes 



High Grade 
CHOCOLATES 

Ma'llard's of New York. 

Apollo and Reymer's 
. Fancy Gift Packages 
A Specialty 
in y 2 , 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds. 
Various High Grade 
CONFECTIONS 
always fresh. 
The Store with the Candy with 
the snap. 

SHOTT'S 

The Home of Fine Candies. 
Bell 27-3. 127 N 9th St. 



Quality Service 
BURDAN'S 
ICE CREAM 

Lebanon - . . . . Pa. 

Pottstown Pa. 

Reading, Pa. 

Wilmington, Del. 

Quality Service 



JACOB SARGENT 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

Ready-to-Wear Clothing 



W. R. WALTZ 
BARBER SHOP 



WEST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Costumes, Caps and Gowns 

WRITE TO 

WAAS and SON 



LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 
Five Departments 

College, Academy, Music, Oratory 
and Art 

Grants Bachelor of Arts, Science and Music Degrees. 




For information write 

REV. G. D. GOSSARD, D. D., Pres. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



THE FINEST THINGS IN COLLEGE 
Creations Come From 

THE COLLEGE BOOK 
STORE 

We are in a Position to Assist You with 
GIFT SUGGESTIONS 

"THE EASIEST WAY" 

First. Graduate Optician — How long did you study before 
getting your diploma? 

Second G. O. — Nearly a week. 
F. G. O. — What detained you? 



JUVENILE TERMINOLOGY 

Teacher — How do you put down a subtraction example, 
Eliza? 

Eliza — Why you puts down one number and 'en you puts 
down 'nother number 'nunder that'n, and you draws a stripe 
'nunder bofe of 'em. 



THE STUBBORN THING 

Plaintiff (in breach of promise suit) — He was the most per- 
sistent suitor I ever had. He simply wouldn't take yes for an 
answer. 



Ladies' and Gents 
Furnishings 



KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Student's Discount 
Packard and Am- 
erican Lady 

SHOES 
Arrow Collars 
and 
SHIRTS 



"Say it with 

Flowers" 
The Flower 
Shop 

19-21 North Eighth St. 
NURSERIES: 

Front and Maple Sts. 
Bell Phone 

LEBANON, PA. 



Satisfy 
Yourself 

Eat Burdan's Ice 
Cream at (the 

Ideal 
Restaurant 

I. H. ROEMIG 
Ladies' Room 



Spring, Spring, Ineffable Spring! 

Robert D. dashed in from his shower, and began slamming shirts and 
neckties in his traveling bag. It was 7:00 A. M. on Easter morning, and 
the spring sun was pouring in on the well-worn copy of Blackstone lying 
on the table by the window. The young Mr. Ellsworth was a rising New 
York lawyer, as his mother fondly informed the neighbors in his home 
town. Robert D. confessed the "New York" and the "lawyer" with pleas- 
ure, but admitted to his dubious roommate that the "rising" was all in 
the point of view. 

The young man in question was far from being a dignified barrister 
at that moment. He was adding those exacting masculine final touches to 
his mop of dark hair with one hand, while with the other he was pawing 
over his ties to find a cravat sufficiently New Yorkish to startle the natives. 

An accurately-aimed pillow brought a remonstrating groan from the 
long-suffering Fred. 

"Hey, get up, old scout! Where are my best cuff-links? I'm going 
home." 

"Huh?" was the sleepy interrogation. 

"Home — heaven — mother — cocoanut custard! I'm leaving for Read- 
ing on the 7:43, and will be back in this old burg tomorrow morning on 
the 6:3 9. Old Browny telephoned last night that our Easter cantata here 
is postponed. His pet soprano has a cold, so they won't need my beautiful 
young voice. Therefore, I'm going home to the choir of my early youth 
to sing once more. See? Say, wake up! Where 'd you say those cuff- 
links were?" 

"In my shirt," answered Fred resignedly. "Give my love to that 
sweet young thing next door." 

Ten minutes later, another pillow shock brought the figure in the 
bed from happy slumber to sharp consciousness again, and he rolled over 
to hear Bob yelling from the stairs: 

"Goodby, old fellow! I'd take you along for a square meal, but I 
know you want to take those violets, you bought, walking up Fifth avenue 
this afternoon. I won't let that blamed youngster next door admire me 
too much. S' long!" 

"The darned cuss!" was Fred's affectionate Sabbath morning response. 

Robert Ellsworth boarded the morning express, settled down in his 
chair, and shook out the paper. The mirror opposite gave back a satisfying 
reflection of his handsome young self. He was feeling splendid and the 
tone of blue in his new Easter cravat pleased him immensely. He won- 
dered humorously if it would suit his mother. When he had been home 
Christmas, he had heard her say confidently to her neighbor, Mrs. Mac- 
Allister: 



2 



THE CRUCIBLE 



"Robert's ties are the only trouble lie ever causes me. I had thought 
that by the time he was twenty-six, he would wear them — well, more sub- 
dued." 

And Mrs. Mac Allister had laughingly replied: "Grace thinks them 
wonderful." 

The latter remark had at first amused and then annoyed him. The 
youngster next door was a pretty little thing but quiet as a rock and all 
eyes whenever he was around. He didn't want her mooning over him. 
Law and girls never did gee. He liked to show a girl a good time now and 
then, but he still had the one to find who cared anything about his beloved 
Blackstone. Not that he admired the intellectual and painfully intelligent 
woman. Good Lord, no! 

He might run over in the afternoon and take the kid — Grace — was 
her name. Grace? — Elizabeth, no it was Grace, — for a walk out the pike 
to Gretna Green. He supposd he could remember enough high school stuff 
to talk about. 

But wouldn't it be good to get home again. That little house out in 
the suburbs sure looked good after the crowded city. Not that he'd ever 
want to live anywhere but New York. Once a New Yorker, always a New 
Yorker had been his motto for the last three years. He turned to his paper, 
scanned over the head lines, and soon lost himself in an account of the 
strategic movements of the lawyer for the defense in the case of the United 
States versus the Standard Oil Company. 

The rain pulled into the shedding and Robert Ellsworth, young New 
York lawyer, followed the hustling crowd into the station lobby. It was 
ten after eleven by the clock above the ticket window. His folks were 
undoubtedly in church, and if he walked briskly, he would reach St. An- 
drew's in time for the end of the parson's prayer. 

The city looked good to him in the morning sunshine. There was a 
promise of spring in the budding trees and in the very air. It gave one a 
homelike feeling to know that anyone of the passersby might be an ac- 
quaintance. 

He reached the church, and, leaving his bag in the choir room, slipped 
into the loft just as the worthy and reverend Doctor Greensleigh was ex- 
tending his petition for blessing on "those who govern this noble and spa- 
cious land of ours." Bob remembered that "the world" and "the heathen" 
were still to be petitioned, and whispered his greeting to Miss Meredith, 
the director. She started in surprise, but cautiously lifted an anthem 
from the rack and handed it down to him with a welcoming smile. 

"Just in time! Take the tenor part in the duet on pages three and 
four. It's an old one of yours. Stephen won't mind." 

When the congregation rose from their knees, after the Doctor's last 
sonorous "Amen," Mrs. Ellsworth felt an irresistible impulse draw her 
eyes from the contemplation of the beauty of the light falling through the 
stained glass window on the mass of lillies below the pulpit. She sat up 
with a gasp to see her son smiling at her from. his old place in the choir 
loft, and shaking hands in a pantomime greeting. 

She nudged her unsuspecting husband, and whispered excitedly: 
"Lands, John, there's Robert." 

There was a marked flutter among the Easter bonnets of the younger 
feminine element of the congregation, and the center of their attraction 
was not the pulpit. Doctor Greensleigh later remarked to Miss Meredith 
that there was a most peculiar break in the spirit of worship between the 
close of the prayer and the beginning of the anthem. The little soprano 
soloist turned around as the choir rose at the first tones from the great 
organ, and caught a glimpse of a beautifully blue tie. 

The anthem was sung excellently and Bob felt himself that the 
"Stabat Mater" duet had never gone better. He wondered who the good- 
looking girl that had ;s!ung with him might be. He leaned over to Miss 
Meredith and asked with interest. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



3 



"Who's the new soprano, Nell? She gave me splendid support in that 
duet." 

"I'll introduce you after service, stranger," was all the satisfaction he 
could get. 

After Bob had planted a kiss on the maternal and paternal cheeks, and 
had listened to their delighted -surprise at his unexpected appearance, he 
made his way through a welcoming circle of friends back to the choir loft. 

"Now, Nell, please introduce me to your new musical find, or I'll 
never sing for you again. " 

"How sad, and what a loss!" was! the reply tempered with a smile, — 
"but, since it's you'' — she tunned ito the slim young lady in blue who was 
standing by the organ humming over a solo and enjoying the teasing of one 
of the voung tenors. "Here, Hon, let Stephen alone a minute." Bob cast 
a disapproving glance at the young chap — college pup, he supposed, "and 
come let me introduce an entire stranger, Mr. Robert D. Ellsworth, of 
New* York City, a rising young lawyer with a tenor voice. Mr. Ellsworth, 
I want you, to meet Miss Grace MacAllison, graduate of the Boston Con- 
servatory, and soprano soloist in Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church, in- 
cidently your next door neighbor. 

Robert D. stared, and vaguely murmured a conventional answer while 
in his mind he was trying to connect this radiantly poised young soloist 
with the MacAllison youngster he thought he knew. 

"And are you a relative of Mrs. Male Allister of this church," he asked 
in confused wonder. 

"Well, rather distantly related, I suppose," was the answer, and 
with a mischievous glance, "I'm her only daughter." Her hlue eyes looked 
innocently into his dark ones, "You .can't possibly belong to the Ellsworths 
who live next door to me?" 

"Not at all, was Bob's prompt reply, "I'm itheir only son. I say, 
Miss Meredith, that's a nice joke to play on an old friend of yours!" 

"Really, Bob, your New Yorkian omniscience is overwhelming at 
times. Now if your legal miind can't comprehend itlhat, run along and have 
Grace help you look it up in( the dictionary, I'm busy." 

That afternoon, after consuming exactly one-half of his mother's large 
sized cocoanut custards, Robert D. Ellsworth, with a hurried and unin- 
telligible explanation to his mother about looking up some information in 
the MacAllister dictionary, sauntered across the lawn. She called to him, 

"Your father's dictionary is on the lower left hand shelf of the/ book 
case in the sitting room, Robert" but Robert had gone. 

Late itlhat evening, as| he was unpacking his bag, he declared to his 
mother that he thought he'd stay home a day -or two. Dad and he could 
clear un some legal data that was bothering him. Did she know where his 
old dress suit was? He was getting sort of old for such affairs, but since 
he was here, he might as well go to Mis® MacAllister's birthday^ dance on 
Tuesday evening. 

The following Wednesday brought a telegram, sent collect, from the 
irrepressible Fred. 

"Blackstone getting hoary with dust. Where the dickens are you? 

Mr. Fred Houston opened the reply telegram later that evening with 
slightly nervous fingers. 

"Hang Blackstone! Suing for life contract with girl next door." 

BOB" 

He paid the boy dazedly, and dropping on the bed, punched a pillow 
reminiscently and muttered: 
"Can you beat it?" 

E. Virginia Smith. 



4 



THE CRUCIBLE 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 

OF 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Requests the honor of your presence at their 
FORTY-THIRD ANNIVERSARY EXERCISES 
FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 1020 
Eight O'clock. Eagle Conservatory. 

St. Patrick's Party 

North Hall parlor was downed in real Irish Green at 8 o'clock, Sat- 
urday evening-, Martin 20th. Everywhere one looked he saw green, — the 
improvised table scarfs, the temporary "frescoeing" on ithe walls, the green 
curtains and draperies, the green baleatrade, the delicate touches of green 
in the ladies' gowns, all contributed their share in convincing us that St. 
Patrick's celebration was at hand. 

Everyone decided to be a genuine Irishman just for one night, so each 
found h is place at a table and sat down to gaze upon a well known Irish 
product, the Irish potato. Since the Irish are an imaginative people the 
committee decided a test should be made as to which ones were the most 
Irish, among us, so each one was asked to elevate the low condition of the 
common potato by some ingenious transformations. After a half hour 
of hard work it was discovered that the common white potato had the 
possibilities of becoming gentlemen of the dude type, baseball men with 
a black eye, "green" riding hoods, and prim little maids. The long Irish 
pipe, the pigs, the donkeys, etc., the mule drivers, were among the clever 
curiosities. 

The next part of the program was a test as to Irish wit, namely, Pro- 
gressive Conversation. "Blarney," "Shamrocks," and "Snakes" were dis- 
cussed. "Irish Ancestors" recalled pleasant memories for some, but the 
subject "Irish Stew" was heartily entered into by everyone present. It 
was a thing not to be talked about, nor dreamed, but something really 
to be seen and enjoyed for the little maidens with the igreen embroidered 
tissue napkins furnished each one with genuine Irish Stew. 

Promptly ait 11 o'clock, the energetic ringing of a beU brought us 
back + o America, and down, to earth. The "Pats" and "Mikes ' stole away 
and the hall looked like a nursery after a party. 

Mathematical Round Table 

The anniversary program of the Mathematical Round Table was given 
at Prof. Lehman's home, on Thursday evening, March 25th. The first num- 
ber on the program was "Mathematical Roll Call" by the sceretary, Miss 
Myrtle Lefever. Each member to be marked present, had to respond to 
some mathematical problem, the solution of which required not so much 
intellectuality, or gray matter, or mathematical skill, as genuine Irish wit. 

The second number was a paper read by Miss Verna Mutch, on the sub- 
ject, "Mathematical Bugs." It was a treatise on over-applied mathematics 
and bid us beware of too much study. 

"Mathematics by the Quittie," by Prof. W. N. Martin, was very witty and 
adventuresome. Prof. Lehman had to go fishing by the Quittie. His six- 
foot pole, stout line, and strong hook proved to be the right kind of fishing 
tackle, for his efforts were not in vain. A fish was caught for each senior 
member of the Round Table. Then something, heavy and unwieldy, be- 
came tangled in his hook, and with difficulty was it drawn from the depths. 
It was a huge box, and on it the address of Prof, and Mrs. J. E. Lehman. 
In it was a token befitting the Easter tide. 

Delightful refreshments were served and the "Knights" of the Round 
Table escorted their ladies home. The evening proved to be another of 
those events that shall be stowed away among the list of pleasant memo- 
ries of our college days. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



5 




JAEGER^ 



THE CRUCIBLE 

Vol. VIII. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, March 23, 1920. No. 9. 



Literary 
OLIVE E. DARLING, '21. 
RHODES STABLEY, '22 Ass't 

Activities 
VERNA E. MUTCH, '2 0. 
HAROLD LUTZ, '23 Ass't. 



Editor in Chief 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '20. 

Associate Editors 
IDA BOMBERGER, '21. 
ORIN J. FARRELL, '21. 
B. F. EMENHEISER, '21. 

Athletic? 

F. DOUGLAS BEIDEL, '20. 
GASTON VANDENBOSCH, '23, Ass't 
Alumni Editor 
CARROLL DAUGHERTY, '21. 
Music Editor, 
WILLIAM HERRING, '20. 



Business Managers 

OHARLElS C. HARTM'AN, '20. 
Assistants 
ELWOOD HEI'SS, '21. 
GEORGE HOHL. '23. 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23. 
RODNEY KREIDER, '22. 
Entered as second class matter, November 12, 1910, at the Postoffice 
at Annville, Pa., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single copies, 15c each. 
Address all business communications to Charles Hartman, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. Items for publication are solicited from stu- 
dents and alumni, and should be in the editor's hands before the first 
and third Monday of each rnoim 



EDITORIAL 

In the great business of life, generation follows generation. When 
one has done its work, there is another ready, yea eager to take up the 
task. Even so is it with THE CRUCIBLE. One more staff has accomplished 
its work and retires with this issue. A new one has already been organ- 
ized and will present the result of their first efforts in the next edition. 

By this change we lose from our band of editors Verna Mutch, Hubert 
R. Snoke, Charles C. Hartman, Douglas A. Beidel, and William I. Herring. 
The mighty chief, having sufficient credits for graduation, has already gone 
from our midst till commencement. The loss of his presence will be felt 
keenly by every student. As an editor-in-chief he was capable and efficient 
and to fill the vacancy that he leaves will be difficult. 

Nevertheless, it is the determination of the new staff to carry on the 
good work that has been started in the founding of THE CRUCIBLE. But 



6 



THE CRUCIBLE 



this will mean intense co-operation, not only on the part of the staff, but 
by the whole student body, working in conjunction with the staff. Stu- 
dents, the various editors are but your representatives. The paper is yours; 
and the staff is but the group of workers who are to bear the brunt of the 
task. 

So, back them up! Lend them your heartiest support! Help make 
THE CRUCIBLE what Lebanon Valley's paper ought to be! The retiring 
staff has labored long and hard. The new staff will do its utmost at every 
turn. But you, O students, are the corporation that publishes the college 
paper. Take all the stock in the enterprise that you possibly can, and you 
will be richly rewarded in dividends. 



When Daddy's Paper's Late 

I'm always somehow awful scared, 

And try to be sedate, 
When I hear the clock strike half-past nine, 

And my daddy's paper's late. 

I eat my breakfast without a word, 

And fold my napkin straight. 
Because, you know, my daddy's there, 

And his morning paper's late. 

My daddy, he gets awful mad, 

When that morning paper's late, 
He paces up and down the yard. 

He stamps out to the gate. 

My dog and I walk off alone, 

(My dog's as scared as I.) 
We hide behind the apple tree 

Till the paper boy goes by. 

I shiver and tremble all the time. 

I'm in a dreadful state. 
I think that you will understand 

When your daddy's paper's late. 



How Much Did You Give? 

At a mass meeting held ostensibly for the purpose of raising money 
for the carrying on of the baseball season, enough was subscribed by the 
students and faculty to see the season through. 

There was but a mere handful of students there; but enthusiasm ran 
rife. In the neighborhood of $400 was subscribed. Professors Gingrich 
and Strickler exhorted the students to do their utmost. That their per- 
suasiveness and powers of exhortation stood them in good stead is evidenced 
by the amount of the subscription. 

With so much "pep" amongst the profs and students, we predict a 
banner year for our school in the national pastime. 



"Y" Leaders Chosen 

The officers for the coming year in the work of the Y. M. C. A. have 
been elected and are about to be installed. They are as follows: President, 
Cretzinger; Vice-President, Stabley; Treasurer, Hastings; Chorister, Sni- 
der; Pianist, Stabley; Librarian, Bartholomew; Secretary, Boyer. 

May they have the best of success in their labors for the betterment 
of the men of the school! 



THE CRUCIBLE 



7 



Inter-Church World Movement 

On March 12th, 13th and 14th, Lebanon Valley was visited by a dele- 
gation representing the Inter-Church World Movement. The purpose is to 
bring before the students of the country the needs and opportunities of 
the Church, especially in the mission field. The delegation consisted of 
the following persons: Miss Vera Blinn, general secretary and treasurer 
of the W. M. A. of the U. B. Church; Professor Showers of Bonebrake 
Theological Seminary; Mrs. John Springer, a missionary from South Africa; 
and Rev. Batdorf and Dr. Kinnard, both of Lancaster. Short speeches 
were made in chapel on Friday morning. Friday evening Rev. Batdorf 
spoke; and a graphic presentation of the conditions found in various mis- 
sion fields was given by Dr. Kinnard in an illustrated lecture. 

Miss Blinn and Professor Showers addressed the students Saturday 
morning; and in the evening Mrs. Springer presented some interesting facts 
about South Africa where industrial civilization is active, and where "the 
most dangerous beast" is the white man who brings to the natives intoxi- 
cating liquors and their accompanying vices. 

Sunday morning Professor Showers preached in the U. B. church. 
Miss Blinn and Mrs. Springer addressed the Y. W. C. A. and Prof. Showers 
the Y. M. C. A. in the afternoon, and in the evening Miss Blinn gave the 
address in the church. 

The messages brought by these people, representing the united efforts 
of the various denominations of the Protestant Church in the evangelizing 
of the world, were well calculated to broaden our vision of the world's 
needs and our responsibility concerning them. 



Installation By the Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 

On Sunday, March 21st, tlhe new officers Of the Y. W. C. A., who 
had been elected at tlhe business! meeting on March l(Mh, were formally in- 
stalled. After the installation a short talk was given by the new presi- 
dent, Mary Shettel. The following are the new Y. W. C. A. officers: 

President Mary Shettel 

Vice-President Margaret Weir 

Treasurer Bffie Hiffs 

Recording Secretary Lena Angell 

Corresponding Secretary Eleanor Shaeffer 



Three Strikes— You're Out 

The lid was pried off the base ball season when in response to a call 
for candidates, issued by Coach Strickler, thirty-two men reported for 
practice. Although larger squads have been here, there was not one which 
looked as promising as our "hopefuls" do. 

Although this was the first practice, the boys have been limbering up 
for the last two weeks, and mid-season form was displayed by everyone. 

The same "pep" and enthusiasm manifested at the mass meeting is in 
evidence on the ball park; and this fact bodes evil for our rivals this year. 

The most promising candidates for the positions are: Pitchers, Dun- 
can, Wolfe, Witmer, Fake, Wolfersberger and Ruiz; Infielders, Capt. Fish- 
burn, Bachman, Moore, Williams, Horine, and Harvey; Outfielders, Daugh- 
erty, Heiss, Clemens, Dunkle, Felty, Carillo, Strine, Nitrauer and Stine. 
Perhaps the most interesting battle for a position is behind the plate. 
Uhler, last year's catcher, bids fair to win the position again; but the irre- 
pressible Matchton is not to be slighted, and it is a toss-up as to who will 
bear the brunt of the catching burden. 

From all indications we have a wonderful team. So, let the students 
and faculty put their shoulders to the wheel, as it were, and give their 
heartiest support to the team, and we know they'll do the rest. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



STYLE THAT COMMENDS YOUR 
TASTE 

Good taste is the first requisite of a good impression. Seek 
style in your clothes by all means 1 — but don't mistake "frills 
and flounces" for smartness. 

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES 

possess style and give you poise and personality — they can't 
change your character, but they reflect taste and make other 
men welcome your society. Always all wool. 

Try our dependable store for your next suit or overcoat. 

MANUFACTURERS CLOTHING CO. 

Style Headquartersi — The Home of Society Brand. 
725 CUMBERLAND STREET, LEBANON, PA. 



For Efficient Service Patronize 

the 

Hershey Laundry 

We are the Best Equipped. 
All work guaranteed. 
Pull Dress Work a Specialty. 

Stine and Strine 



AGENTS 



Photographs of 
Quality 
BLAZIER'S 
STUDIO 

LEBANON, PA. 
Help to Identify You. 



BOYER'S 

the best place for all kinds of FINE STATIONERY 
BLANK BOOKS, LOOSE LEAF AND MEMO BOOKS.' 

Popular 

FICTION 

Pennants! and Cushion Tops. L. V. C. Seal Jewelry. 

Kodaks and Film 

Developing and Printing. Snapshot Albums. 

Fountain Pens, Flash Lights, Toys, Games, 
Books, Decorations. 

19 W. Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



RUCIBLE 



9 



Bowman's Model 
BAKERY 

FOR QUALITY 

Bread, Cakes, Buns, 
Pies, Cream Puffs, 
Doughnuts and 
Crullers. 

Opposite the Post Office, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



J. F. APPLE CO. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Manufacturing 
Jewelers 

Class and Fraternity Pins 

RINGS, MEDALS PRIZE 
CUPS 

Also an Attractive Line of 
STOCK JEWELRY 



CHOICE 

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR 
GIFTS 
"HARPEL'S" 

Kodaks and Film Pictures and Frames 



WE MAKE 

CLASS PINS AND RINGS 
Commencement Announcements 

OF QUALITY 

BASTIAN BROS. CO. 

272 BASTIAN BLDG. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



NEED A NEW TRUNK, BAG, SUIT 
CASE, TRAVELING CASE, 

LEATHER GOODS 
Bicycle and Sporting Goods? 

We carry a fine line of goods. 
PRICES RIGHT QUALITY RIGHT 

E. M. HOTTENSTEIN, 

CUMBERLAND STREET LEBANON, PA. 



10 



THE CRUCIBLE 



All American Bath 
and Barber Shop 

H. M. MONFORD, Prop. 

Eagle Hotel Building, Annville 
Penna. 

Bell Phone 

Engagements by Appointment. 

Both Phones 
ASK FOR SIMON P. FEGAN'S 

Soft Drinks 

Manufactured by Simon P. 
Fegan 

536 NORTH EIGHTH ST., 
LEBANON, PA. 

PALACE of SWEETS 
(\ SUPERIOR QUALITY ONI* 

731 CUMBERLAND STREET 
LEBANON, PA 



Bell Phone 
SUPERFINE CHOCOLATES, 
BON BONS, CANDY AND ICE 
CREAM 

Fresh Home-Made Candies and 

Ice Cream Daily 
Ice Cream and Candies made 
to order 



SAY IT WITH FLOWERS 

J. F. Vavrous Sons 

512 Cumberland St., 
LEBANON, PA. 



Harvey L. Seltzer 

One Price 

Clothier and Men's 
Furnisher 

"The House of Good Values" 

769 CUMBERLAND ST., 
LEBANON, PA. 

Annville National 
Bank 

of ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Capital Stock ....$100,000.00 
Surplus and Undivided 

Profits $175,253.00 



Umbrellas and 
Traveling Goods 

SPORTING GOODS 

E. J. Snavely & Co. 

"MARKET SQUARE" 

FINK'S BAKERY 

for the 

BEST BAKED PRODUCTS 
You Pay for the Articles 
QUALITY and SERVICE 
Cast You Nothlimg. 



"Stetson' 
Hats 



'Interwoven' 
Hose 



The Men's Shop 

in the Hershey Dept. Store at 
HERSHEY, PA. 

New Styles in Men's Wear 

are here 
while the styles are new — 
not when they are dead. 



"Hart, Schaffner 
and Marx" 
and 

"Kirschbaum" 
Clothes 



High Grade 
CHOCOLATES 

Maillard's of New York. 
Apollo and Reymer's 
Fancy Gift Packages 
A Specialty 
in 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds. 
Various High Grade 
CONFECTIONS 
always fresh. 
The Store with the Candy with 
the snap. 

SHOTTS 

The Home of Fine Candies. 
Bell 27-J. 127 N 9th St. 



Quality Service 
BURDAN'S 
ICE CREAM 

Lebanon pa. 

Pottstown, pa. 

Reading, p a . 

Wilmington Del. 

Quality Service 



JACOB SARGENT 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

Ready-to-Wear Clothing 



W. R. WALTZ 
BARBER SHOP 



WEST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Costumes, Caps and Gowns 

WRITE TO 

WAAS and SON 



LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 
Five Departments 

College, Academy, Music, Oratory 
and Art 

Grants Bachelor of Arts, Science and Music Degrees. 




For information write 

REV. G. D. GOSSARD, D. D., Pres. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



ii: «*■ ~— 




THE 
CRUCIBLE 

% 1 


- 

f 
i 




Lebaooe Valley College j 







THE FINEST THINGS IN COLLEGE 
Creations Come From 

THE COLLEGE BOOK 
STORE 

We are in a Position to Assist You with 
GIFT SUGGESTIONS 




"THE EASIEST WAY" 
First Graduate Optician — How long did you study before 
getting your diploma? 

Second G. O. — Nearly a week. 
F. G. O. — What detained you? 



JUVENILE TERMINOLOGY 

Teacher — How do you put down a subtraction example, 
Eliza? 

Eliza — Why you puts down one number and 'en you puts 
down 'nother number 'nunder that'n, and you draws a stripe 
'nunder bote of 'em. 



THE STUBBORN THING 

Plaintiff (in breach of promise suit) — He was the most per- 
sistent suitor I ever had. He simply wouldn't take yes for an 
answer. 



Ladies' and Gents 
Furnishings 



KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Student's Discount 
Packard and Am- 
erican Lady 

SHOES 
iirrow Collars 
and 
SHIRTS 



"Say it with 

Flowers" 
The Flower 
Shop 

19-21 North Eighth St. 
NURSERIES: 

Front and Maple Sts. 
Bell Phone 

LEBANON, PA. 



Satisfy 
Yourself 

Eat Burdan's Ice 
ICream at jthe 

Ideal 
Restaurant 

I. H. ROEMIG 
Ladies' Room 




The Crucible 




The Romance of a Lost Letter 

Once I was loved and cherished, now I lie old and forgotten in a 
trunk with many cousins like myself. I have lain with many other 
'treasures, in and old trunk, within the attic of a rose covered cotatgc 
for many years. Sometimes it is months before I hear a step on the dusty 
planks. Then when it comes, it is so light, so soft and almost sweet, the 
footsteps die away and the trunk lid is lifted. I find myself with other 
treasures taken out. Murmered words deep sighs and sometimes tears 
fall upon me. I look up into a sweet kind iface with eyes that are fai 
away, soft brown hair with silver. I believe it is like Spring with the 
soft rains, the light breezes, and the sweet smell of lavender above and 
over all. 

Sometimes I am very lonely but mostly always happy because my 
companions and I have jolly times, relating our past experiences. 'Tis 
lovely to hear the fan tell of all the society balls, dances and dinners 
she attended; to hear the laces and ribbons tell of all their youthful 
pleasures; to hear the faded flowers tell of their wonderful days, the 
kisses and caresses bestowed upon them, the sweet words whispered over 
them. And then all listen with tears in their eyes to my sad story. 

I was created when this lady, my ilavender lady was young and gay. 
I remember well, I first saw the light of day under a sunset sky, with my 
lady lying in a hammock. I'm full of sunshine and gladness and yet there 
is a sting of pain din) my very heart; because of a suspected sorrow of my 
lady. 

When I was all complete, my lady ,put me in my beautiful envelope 
house, pink edged and bordered in gold. She sealed the house and put 
my name and numlber on the front door. I was carried down a' long shady 
lane just as the siun was sinking, and dropped in a quaint little box. I 
stayed in this' box until next morning when a stately old man put ime into 
many other icousins in a large bag. I rode some distance to a small white 
building and there I met more friends. It seemed many of . us were bound 
for the same place. I traveled some time on a black, puffy, jolting train 
and was placed on a beautiful big waiter bud. We siped out to sea and 
were rocked to sleep by the songs of the angry waves. Soon our water bud 
rested and we were at a beautiful island. Many days I laid in a little whitt 
building wiith others like mysellif. Each day one of my friends Would leave 
me but more new friends kept coming. 

I began to think I too would soon go and one fine day I did. But 
to my great disappointment I went over the same road I had come. I 
didn't care for itihe scenery nor the water as I slept below most of the time 



THE CRUCIBLE 



mUJf* Twl" h 1 la ? d , 6d T Ud SOOn WES sl P eedin S over the land in a fast ex- 
piess i wo days later I was in that same 'Kittle ibox I smarted from 

«.h« i f? y hair6d man carried m « to a quaint little room of pink and 
white and I found myself in the; tibSfa white .bands of my lady lying in a 
tiny eanoped bed. She pressed me to her heart and, fasti came the rain on 
my house of pink and gold. She whispered, she murmered, "O where 
is he! Where is my love?" 

I stayed with her until the was well enough to walk in the garden 
and then she iput me in a lavender scented box on her dressing table 
Time wore on, it seemed years to me, and one day she packed me with 
other treasures in the old trunk where I am today. 

I never knew my lady showered tears on me every time she came 
to the attic and took me from my hidingplace. One day, a day in April 
Spring was here with it-3 joy, she came and sat beside the old trunk with 
me on her laip. Rain was pattering on tlhe tin roof like pennies falling 
in a Iffirtflei box- r but her drops of grief came faster and seemed larger than 
those outside. They flashed on m y worn old pink and gold envelope. 
'Twas this day she told me iher story. 

My lavender lady had a lover in her youthful days. They loved 
each in theirXown way, deep, deep in tlheir hearts — till' one day ihe no long- 
er able to conceal his love, expressed it, asking her to be his — only his 
forever. She not knowing how deep her love for him and not knowing 
whether it was- true love, in an unthinking way — toM him to wait awhile. 
He, thinking she cherished, no love for him, departed to a distant country. 
I was the'r messenger, their cupid — only I didn't do my duty. I , did not 
reach him to beg his pardo,n and bear the messaige of her love for him. 
I came back to my lavender lady and have lived with her ever since. This 
is the story I tell to my friends the fan, the laces, the ribbons and faded 
roses. 

But ah! — wait! — I hear foot steps and they are made by more than 
one. The key in igr'ndrn^, the Md' squealks. I isee the \Ught of day. A 
gentle hand take me out — 'tis my lavender lady and with her, her lover. 
She with tears in her eyes reads my story to him. I am crushed between 
a manly, strong, yet caressing hand and a dainty white lily hand — my 
lavender lady's, as their lips meet in the twlight over the old trunk in the 
attic. 



The Crucible's Wit 

Heiser — "Professor Derrickson, how long would a fishworm live on a 
hook?" 

Professor — "Till some sucker would come along and take him off." 

Dr. McClean — "I wish that that clop-hopper of a Faust would stop 
making a noise like a barn, reciting like a grasshopper and coughing like 
a horse." 



Prof. Gingrich — "How many sexes are there, Emenheiser?" 
Ben — "Three: Male sex, female sex, and insects." 

, t'w - * * * 

Seems as if some of the young men around our college would make 
good soldiers. You can treat them, but they won't retreat. 

* * * 

Dr. McClean — "Mr. Daddain, please turn around front. We don't 
want all of the beauty in the back part of the room." 



— 




THE 



CRUCIBLE 



3 



$500 For a Play 



The present serious shortage of nurses and the excellent opportunities 
for college trained women to attain positions of leadership in this rapidly 
developing profession will be emphasized by the country-wide celebration 
on May 12th, of the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Florence Nightin- 
gale. One of the most interesting features of the celebration is the prize 
of $500 offered by the Central Council for Nursing Education, for the best 
full length play based on incidents in the life of Florence Nightingale. 

The competition closes August 1st, 1920. Manuscripts should be sub- 
mitted in typewritten form accompanied by a stamped return envelope, 
and should be addressed to the Nightingale Centennial Committee, National 
Organization for Public Health Nursing, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City. 
The manuscript should be signed, not by the name of the author, but by 
a pen name. An accompanying envelope inscribed with this same pen 
name should contain the full name and address of the author. The fol- 
lowing committee has been appointed to judge the manuscripts: Mrs, 
Minnie Maddern Fiske, Miss Marylka Modjeska, Miss Alice Beer, Miss 
Lillian D. Wald. 

No restrictions are imposed either on the form of the play or on the 
treatment of the subject matter. It is urged, however, that persons wishing 
to compete for the prize prepare themselves by a study of Florence Nightin- 
gale's writings and of the biographies, such as the two volume "Life" by 
Sir Edward T. Cook (MacMillan & Co., New York), and the section on 
Florence Nightingale in Lyton Strachey's "Eminent Victorians," G. Putnam 
Sons, New York. 

Suggestions may also be obtained from the Florence Nightingale 
Tableaux published by MacMillan, and from Mary Aid's brief monograph, 
both of which may be obtained in pamphlet form through the Nightingale 
Centennial Committee, National Organization for Public Health Nursing, 
156 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 



The Junior Recital of the members of the class of 1921, who are spe- 
cializing in music and oratory attracted a large audience to the audito- 
rium of the Conservatory of Music, Tuesday evening, April 20th. A pro- 
gram of beautiful piano and pipe organ selections, interspersed with in-| 
teresting and well presented readings was given and was enjoyed by the 
auditors. The students acquitted themselves in a manner which gained for 
themselves hearty applause and reflected much credit upon their instruc- 
tors. The members of the class are: Misses Kathryn Englehardt, Sara 
Moeckel, Beulah Swartzbaugh, Emma Witmeyer, Josephine Bonitz, Kath- 
ryn Hummelbaugh, Mabel V. Miller, and Edith V, Stager. 



In recognition of the excellent cage record of the girls' varsity bas- 
ketball team during the past season, Coach Paul L. Strickler and Manager 
Huber D. Strine on the evening of April 22nd tendered the members of 
the team a party at the Penn-Harris Hotel in Harrisburg. The coach and 
manager and their guests were conveyed to and from the Capitol City in 
automobiles belonging to Howard Kreider, of Annville, and Daniel Walter 
of Lebanon. The following members of the team were guests: Misses Jen- 
nie Sebastian, Gladys and Dorothy Fencil, Elizabeth Kreider, Kathryn 
Long Elizabeth Smith and Sara Garver. Mr. and Mrs. Howard Kreider 



Junior Recital 



Girls' Varsity 




4 



THE CRUCIBLE 



of Annville and Daniel Walter of Lebanon were also guests. 

The girls' team, captained by Miss Gladys Fencil, had a highly suc- 
cessful season, winning nine games out of thirteen. Four were lost by 
only small margins. 



How the "Grads" Are Faring 

About thirty-five members of the Alumni Association and ex-students 
ot Lebanon Valley College gathered at the Rittenhouse Hotel in Philadel- 
phia on the evening of April 16th, and there held a Lebanon Valley College 
banquet. The banqueters were exclusively residents of the Quaker City 
or its suburbs, with the exception of the guests of honor, President G D 
Gossard and Dr. J. E. Lehman of the college. 

The banquet was appropriately timed, since it almost immediately 
followed the overwhelming defeat visited upon the University of Pennsyl- 
vania base ball n^ne by the Blue and White diamond squad. Practically 
all of th- speakers, who included Dr. S. C. Enck, '91, toastmaster, and Dr 
Carl Schmidt, '14, Charles Arndt '14 and Dr. J. E. Lehman, '74, during 
the course of their addresses referred to the athletic victory of the day 
before. Miss Helen M. Schaak, '18, gave a reading; Miss Mary Musser, '10, 
and Dr. Ralph Engle, '05, sang very entertainingly. 

These officers were elected for the Philadelphia branch of the Asso- 
ciation: Presicfent, Dr. S. C. Enck, '91; vice-president, Edith M Lehman 
'13; secretary, Ruth Haines, '19; treasurer, Victor A. Arndt, '05. 

The following were in attendance: Misses Edith M.' Lehman '13, 
Emma R. Loos '01, Ruth Engle '15, Martha Schmidt '19, Mary Musser 'lo' 
Helen Schaak '18, Ada M. Beidler '18, Florence E. Clippinger '13, Esther 
N. Schell '12, Sara E. Zimmerman '13, Martha E. Snyder '14, Ruth Haines 
'19; Messrs. Walter K. Fasnacht ex-,18, Ralph F. Engle '05, E Kephart 
Boughter '13, John A. Long '16, Frank Butler ex-'20, Carl F Schmidt '14 
Charles H. Arndt '14, -Victor A. Arndt '05, Emmett C. Roop '03, A. L. Line- 
baugh '08, Lester A. Rodes '14, Wilbert D. Peck '19, S. C. Enck. '91, D S 
Eshleman '94, Mrs. Mellie F. Bowman '94, Mrs. Ida Bowman Richards '94, 
J. E. Lehman '74, President G. D. Gossard, Maurice W. Bowman, Mrs. s! 
C. Enck, Miss Rose Reddick, Miss Anna Karns, Mr. and Mrs. George W 
Haines. 



James G. March, '16, was recently elected principal of the public 
schools at Sunbury, Pa. 

Prof. Stanley R. Oldham, '08, principal of the Maine Central Institute, 
Pittsfield, Maine, is the author of an unique English textbook, entitled 
"Laboratory Manual of English Composition." The purpose o? this book is 
well illustrated by the following quotations from the preface: "Indeed, 
it may be said that the method of this book is summed up in these three 
words, investigation, comparison and practice — and the greatest of these 
is practice. Let the English classroom become a laboratory for experiment 
and practice, with teacher and pupil working together on the exercises." 

Roger S. B. Hartz, recently discharged from the United States army 
after serving overseas in the capacity of a lieutenant-colonel, is now located 
at Havana, Cuba, where he is in the employ of a prominent American con- 
struction company. 

Among alumni who attended the Kalozetean Literary Society anniver- 
sary celebration on April 9th were the Rev. Ira S. Ernst, of Chewsville, 
Md.; the Rev. C. R. Longenecker, of Palmyra; Ray Grube, of Ephrata; Miss 
Ethel Strickler, of Lebanon, and the Rev. T. B. Lyter, of Woodbine, Pa. 
with his wife, who was Miss Ruth Strickler, of Lebanon. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



5 




THE CRUCIBLE 



Vol. VI I I. Annville, Pa., Tuesday , April 27, 1920. No. 10. 

Editor-in-Chief 
ORIN J. FARRELL, '21 

Associates 
OLIVE E. DARLING, '21 
B. P. EMENHEISER, '21 
AMOS HAAS, '21 
MIRIAM CASSEL, '22. 

Literary Athletics 
RHODES R. STABLEY, '22 GUY W MOORE '21 

MAE REEVES, '23 HAROLD LUTZ, ''2.3 

Activities Music 
GEORGE O. HOHL, '23 EMMA WITMEYER '21 

ETHEL LEHMAN, '22 BEULAH SWARTZBAUGH, '21 

Alumni Jokes and Exchanges 

LUCILE SHENK, '23 HEBER MUTCH, '23 

Business Manager 
CARROLL C. DAUGHERTY, 21 

Assistants 
P. RODNEY KREIDER. '22 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23 
GASTON VANDEN BOSCHE, '23. 

Entered as second class matter, November 12, 1910, at the Post Office 
at Annville, Pa., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Single copies, 15c each. 

Address all communications to Carroll C. Daugherty, Lebanon Valley 
College, Annville, Pa. Items for publication are solicited from students 
and alumni, and should be in the editor's hands before the second and 
fourth Friday of each month. 



EDITORIAL 

When the fickle weather of April merges into the clear even sunshine 
of May, we feel that Spring has really come to stay, and Winter has paid 
his last call. Centuries ago our ancestors rejoiced at this victory of Spring- 
time and in the month of May went out into the open fields to celebrate in 
simple pantomime the death of Winter and the revival of Spring. The 
beauty of this custom still appeals to our aesthetic sense, and soon L V 
will celebrate the ages old festival of May Day. 



6 



THE CRUCIBLE 



May Day has always been one of the happiest days of the whole col- 
lege year. The very campus, decked in festal garb, seems to rejoice in 
welcoming crowds of alumni and friends. It is hoped that this year, in 
spite of obstacles, the traditional charm of May Day may not diminish but 
rather increase. Unfortunately, owing to an oversight on the part of the 
management of the Athletic Association, a baseball game and a track 
meet have been scheduled for May 8th, and a number of our men will be 
absent. This unfortunate circumstance makes it imperative for the suc- 
cess of the festival, that all who remain show an intense interest and 
doubled energy in carrying through the program. Although May Day is 
conducted under the auspices of the Y. W. C. A., it is an affair of universal 
interest to the whole school, and the Y. W. expects the hearty co-operation 
of all the men just as the athletic teams rely upon the co-operation of the 
girls. 

The entertainment committee has been laboring under great difficul- 
ties owing to the loss of the baseball men, and the delay resulting from a 
vain endeavor to adjust the conflict between the athletic schedule and our 
date for May Da, . However, there is still opportunity to work up an ex- 
cellent program if all who are asked will do their best. Can we count on 
you? 



Kalozetean Literary Society Anniversary 

On Friday evening, April 9th, was held the exercises of the forty-third 
anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary Society. The first act was held in 
Engle Hall, where the audience enjoyed a literary treat, consisting of an 
address and two orations. The president, Chas. C. Hartman, delivered an 
address on the importance of colleges to civilization. Edward Allen made 
personal health his theme, and Claude Kleinfelter completed the orations 
by a strong denunciation of war. Douglas Beidle gave a southern reading 
on "Love, Plain, Ordinary Love." Musical numbers were presented by 
Ira Ruth and Chas. Hoerner. 

Act two was laid in the "Gym," where refreshments were served and 
social hour was observed. 



Y. W. Lassies Go South 

Sunday afternoon, April 18th, Y. W. C. A. was held in South Hall 
parlor, — the first time in several years. The South Hall girls, led by Miss 
Minerva Raab, had charge of the meeting. Miss Maryland Glenn sang "Face 
to Face," in a pleasing manner; Miss Raab had for her subject, "How Do 
We Pray." After a well rendered violin solo by Miss Christine Happel, 
the girls freely discussed the subject. This was the best attended meet- 
ing of the year, and was enjoyed by all. South Hall extends an invitation 
to Y. W. for another meeting in the future. 



In a recent meeting of the Student Volunteers one of the members 
prayed for "Grace for our outgoing missionary;" Another requested that 
"a guardian Angell be sent to protect Crim." 



_ T H E CRUCIBLE 7 

Victorious '23! 

By defeating the Seniors 3 7 to 16 on March 24th the Freshmen cage- 
men copped the Inter-Class League pennant and ended the reign of basket 
ball at L. V. C. for the 1919-20 season. Soon after the opening of the 
season the League resolved itself into a struggle between the Sophomores 
and the Freshmen as neither the Seniors nor Juniors could withstand the 
attacks of the two teams of underclassmen. But the first year men by dint 
of better playing all around soon forged their way to the top and were 
still there when the league schedule was concluded. Only two games were 
los* by the Freshmen, while seven were won, thereby giving the green- 
crowned lads a percentage of 77 8. And besides, the Freshmen in their nine 
games scored 52 more points than their nearest competitors. Risser was 
the leader among the Freshmen scorers, while Smith, the captain of the 
quintet ran him a close second. Forward Faust also stood high m the 
scoring' list. In number of field goals scored, Smith was only one behind 
Herr, Sophomore, and leading scorer in the league. 



Freshmen . . 
Sophomores 
Seniors 
Juniors . . . 



Herr, Sophomore 
Uhler, Junior . . . 
Risser, Freshman 
Smith, Freshman 
Berger, Senior . 
Faust, Freshman 
Strine, Senior . . 





Won 


Lost 


p. C. 


Points 




7 


2 


.778 


269 




5 


3 


.625 


217 




3 


6 


.333 


175 




2 


6 


.250 


172 




Field 


Foul 




Total 


Games Goals 


Goals 


Missed 


Points 


8 


37 


51 


53 


125 


8 


25 


56 


67 


106 


7 


12 


67 


51 


91 


9 


36 


8 


18 


80 


8 


17 


26 


34 


60 


8 


24 


2 


10 


50 


9 


21 








42 



L. V. vs. U. of P. 



The student body went wild on the night of April 15th. Its diamond 
stars returned on that evening from Philadelphia, victors in a base ball 
fray with the fast University of Pennsylvania nine. By a score of 6 to 1 
they had handed Penn its first defeat of the season and covered themselves 
with glory by batting five of the university pitchers all over the lot while 
their own pitcher, Walter Wolf, a Connecticut youngster, held the univer- 
sity's stars to a lone run with his southpaw slants. 

L. V. was scheduled as a practice game, taking the place of Franklin 
and Marshall who cancelled, but Moore, Bachman and Fishburn quickly 
disappointed Penn by slashing out a double, triple and singly and scoiing 
two runs in the very first inning. Scheffey, also a portsider, was on the 
mound for Penn but he lasted only three innings. Ituntztnger, another 
Penn ace, took the mound and was pitching well, but was relieved because 
of a sore arm. He was followed by Harvey, who took to the showers after 
walking four men in succession. Gibbs followed but was replaced by 
Murray who finished the game. Two singles, an error and a free pass net- 
ted L. V. their third run in the third inning. 

Walter Wolf was the hero of the game. His pitching was air-tight and 
he was invincible in the pinches. He was given faultless support in the 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Held and Moore, Bachman and Fishburn helped him score a victory by slug- 
Ring like big leaguers. Moore led the slaughter with three doubles- Fish- 
burn had a triple, double and single and Bachman a triple and single 
Wolf himself banged out a triple on one of his trips to the plate. 

On the return of the team the students, after a rousing reception 
formed a pajama parade and visited the homes of all of the faculty mem- 
bers announcing the score and calling for speeches. An entire period was 
given to cheering and speeches in chapel next morning. 

While the varsity was defeating Penn, the scrubs cleaned up the Ann- 
ville High School nine by a 4 to 2 score. Fake was on the mound for 
the reserves and Yake for Annville, and both twirled good ball Strine 
Stabley and Fake were the chief offenders with the bat for the scrubs 



W. E, Herr Receives Fine Offers 

William E. Herr, director of activities of the Navy Y. M. C A in 
Norfolk, Va., has recently been offered the positions of General Secretary 
of a Navy y. M. C. A. in New England and of an Army Association in the 
South, but after consideration Mr. Herr decided to remain in charge of 
the four departments of activities at the Norfolk Navy Y. M. C. A. His 
committee of management raised his salary so as to cover the same which 
he would have received at either place. They did this voluntarily after 
Mr. Herr decided to stay. Both the offers were flattering, and presented 
to him by his National Board, after years of service in Navy work. Mr. 
Herr began Y. M. C. A. work as an assistant, and went up through the vari- 
ous departments until now he directs the religious, physical, social and 
educ? onal departments in the large Norfolk Association. He graduated 
from L. V. C. in 1907. 



W. S. G. A. Party 

North Hall was the scene of a merry making party April 17th, when 
the halls and parlors echoed with the merry laughs of the spring clad lasses 
of our alma mater. Games and music were the main features of the even- 
ing. The fair lasses wore their prettiest frocks and sweetest smiles as 
they flitted through the halls. The handsome sex were made very con- 
spicuous by their absence. At a late hour the merrymakers enjoyed punch, 
sandwiches, dainty cakes and crackers, and later — pleasant dreams. 



South Hall was just about to retire when a soft step was heard in the 
hall. Everybody was scared; girls threw down magazines in exchange for 
college books, and tried to assume innocent airs, for they knew 'twas their 
preceptress. She did not look so cheery when she said, "Girls, will you 
all be in the parlor in half an hour?" 

Many silent conferences were held, and finally at the appointed hour 
the girls in dainty attire befitting dormitory life at that hour, stole softly 
down the sairway in moccasins. 

Miss Adams received the girls in the daintily decorated parlor, Miss 
Heffelman in due honor to her South Hall days of '17 served. 

Conversation drifted to parties, when Heffie remarked "It's about 
time we were having another sophomore party." 



THE CRUCIBLE 



9 



Miss Adams asked, "But where do you get enough chairs?" 
Heffie— thinking of Saturday evenings: "We have about enough." 

Miss Adams further remarked, "In speaking of sophomore parties 
Christine looks bored." 

Christine holding her sore eye replies: "I'm suffering." 
Miss Adams: "Well,y ou don't have to stay." 

Miss Adams in response to many requests honored her guests by read- 
ing impersonations with true talent. Just then the tinkling of the retiring 
bell from he upper hall scattered the girls to happy dreams 



And There Was Nothing Left! 

All love was gone, he did not care 

For wifey strong and deft; 
The table — cupboard — house — was bare 

— And there was nothing left! 

He went his way to Social Whirls 

With tread so slow so deft; 
He spent his coin on chorus girls 

— 'Till there was nothing left. 

'Twas 4 A. M. and home he stole 

With tread so slow so deft; 
A rolling pin — a crock — a bowl — 

— And there was nothing left! 



Come, Visit North Hall 

Shall we go to the third floor first? Alright, this way, turn to your 
right. Th ; 3 -is Milred's) room. Why so noisy? Lets peep and see. Oh! 
its Hele-i, Kath. H., K'ath. K. and Mike playing a game of five hundred, 
while Lena and Miriam stir the fudge. What does the sign next door 
say? "BUSY" — M. V. M. 

Angus and Darling are studying Biology. Don't disturb them. No. 
|35. The door is ajar, but. mo one is home. Oh! here is a picture of Beck 
and one of Witmer too. That boisterous laughing must come from Lula's 
room. Yes, /here are Dot, Esther, Verna and Eleanor making paper roses 
for May Day. 

Second floor next. Sh! walk easy this is Dr. McLean's apartment. 
That corner soiife belongs to Dora, Vlirgimia, and Myrtle. As usual Pearl and 
Mary Bortner are entertailning the crowd. 

Here comes the Hall President Ruth Evans. I thought they were too 
'noisy. Behold, the middle suite, the habitat af the W. G. G. A presi- 
dent and Helena. Take a peep and see tlhe diligent khitters. A few 
steps more and we will be at the domicile of Sara and the twin Ruths. 
Yes, Jennie is here too. All are studying as usual. Hark! the bell rinigs\ 
Sure enough, it is 10.15. It's Miss Miller returning from her evening 
stroll. Another bell. 10.20 and light out. Good night. 



10 



THE CRUCIBLE 



STYLE THAT COMMENDS YOUR 
TASTE 

Good taste is the first requisite of a good impression. Seek 
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Try our dependable store for your next suit or overcoat. 

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Style Headquarters^ — The Home of Society Brand. 
725 CUMBERLAND STREET, LEBANON, PA. 



For Efficient Servtice Patronize 
the 

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All work guaranteed. 
Pull Dress Work a Specialty. 

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AGENTS 



Photographs of 
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Help to Identify You. 



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the best place for all kinds of FINE STATIONERY, 
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Popular 

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Pennants' and Cushion Tops. L. V. C. Seal Jewelry. 

Kodaks and Film 

Developing and Printing. Snapshot Albums. 

Fountain Pens, Flash Lights, Toys, Games, 
Books, Decorations. 

19 W. Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



11 



Bowman's Model 
BAKERY 

FOR QUALITY 

Bread, Cakes, Buns, 
Pies, Cream Puffs, 
Doughnuts and 
Crullers. 

Opposite the Post Office, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



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Manufacturing 
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Class and Fraternity Pins 

RINGS, MEDALS PRIZE 
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Also an Attractive Line of 
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CHOICE 

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Kodaks and Film Pictures and Frames 



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CLASS PINS AND RINGS 
Commencement Announcements 

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NEED A NEW TRUNK, BAG, SUIT 
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Bicycle and Sporting Goods? 

We carry a fine line of goods. 
PRICES RIGHT QUALITY RIGHT 

E. M. HOTTENSTEIN, 

CUMBERLAND STREET LEBANON, PA. 



12 



THE CRUCIBLE 



All American Bath 
and Barber Shop 

H. M. MONFORD, Prop. 

Eagle Hotel Building, Annville 
Penna. 

Bell Phone 

Engagements by Appointment. 

Both Phones 
ASK FOR SIMON P. FEGAN'S 

Soft Drinks 

Manufactured by Simon P. 
Fegan 

536 NORTH EIGHTH ST., 
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PALACE of SWEETS 
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731 CUMBERLAND STREET 
LEBANON. PA 



Bell Phone 
SUPERFINE CHOCOLATES, 
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CREAM 

Fresh Home-Made Candies and 

Ice Cream Daily 
Ice Cream and Candies made 
to order 



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512 Cumberland St., 
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Clothier and Men's 
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769 CUMBERLAND ST., 
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Annville National 
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Surplus and Undivided 

Profits $175,253.00 



Umbrellas and 
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for the 

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You Pay for the Articles 
QUALITY and SERVICE 
Cast You Nothing. 



"Stetson' 
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'Interwoven' 
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The Men's Shop 

in the Hershey Dept. Store at 
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New Styles in Men's Wear 

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while the styles are new — 
not when they are dead. 



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High Grade 
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Bell 27-J. 127 N 9th St. 



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WRITE TO 

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LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 
Five Departments 

College, Academy, Music, Oratory 
and Art 

Grants Bachelor of Arts, Science and Music Degrees. 




For information write 

REV. G. D. GOSSARD, D. D., Pres. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



THE 
CRUCIBLE 

Lebanon Valley College 




THE FINEST THINGS IN COLLEGE 
Creations Come From 

THE COLLEGE BOOK 
STORE 

We are in a Position to Assist You with 
GIFT SUGGE STIONS 

"THE EASIEST WAY" 
First Graduate Optician — How long did you study before 
getting your diploma? 

Second G. O. — Nearly a week. 
F. G. O. — What detained you? 



JUVENILE TERMINOLOGY 

Eliza'' eacher—How d0 you P ut down a subtraction example, 

Eliza — Why you puts down one number and 'en you puts 
down •nother number 'nunder that'n, and you draws a stripe 
nunder bofe of 'em. 



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Plaintiff (in breach of promise suit)— He was the most per- 
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Ladies' and Gents 
Furnishings 



KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Student's Discount 
Packard and Am- 
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SHOES 
Arrow Collars 
and 
SHIRTS 



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19-21 North Eighth St. 
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Satisfy 
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Eat Burdan's Ice 
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Ladies' Room 



THE CRUCIBLE 



Varsity Baseball 



Seven gumes have been contested by Lebanon Valley's varsity nine 
since the last issue of THE CRUCIBLE, three of that number being checked 
up in the winning column and four in the list of lost games. However, two 
of the lost games were played with semi-professional clubs, thus leaving 
three victories over and two defeats by college teams. 

The first of these games was that against the Lebanon team of the 
Bethlehem Steel League at Lebanon on April 29th. The fray was a walk- 
away for the steel men, the score being 19 to 1. The loss is not, however, 
a discredit to the team as they were up against ex-big leaguers and pro- 
fessional players, and the score does not fairly represent the type of ball 
put" up by the collegians. One cause for rejoicing over the game was that 
the L. V. boys sent Mayer, who pitched a game for the Chicago White Sox 
in the world's series of last year, to the showers after a short stay on the 
. mound. 

Captain Pishburn's squad recovered their batting eye and their usual 
pep on the college athletic field on May 5th and, with Southpaw Witmer 
on the mound and hurling unhittable ball, easily won from the Franklin 
and Marshall nine by the score of 9 to 0. L. V.'s men hit timely and heavy, 
Horine and Witmer leading with the willow. 

The very next day the outfit journeyed to Myerstown and took into 
camp their old rival, Albright, to the tune of 5 to 1. Here Wolf was just 
as stingy with hits as his mound partner had been the day before and "Haps" 
Benfer's would-be athletes were set down in one-two-three order in every 
inning except two. Moore was responsible for half of Lebanon Valley's six 
hits while Matchton played a creditable game behind the bat, cutting off 
no less than six men on the base paths with his reliable pegs. 

Dickinson pulled the unexpected at the athletic field in Annville on 
May 12th and hung a defeat on Coach Strickler's diamond men with a 4 to 2 
score. L. V. outhit their opponents, but erratic fielding helped Dickinson 
in their, run-getting. Dickinson garnered all four of their runs in the third 
inning on a single and double, a walk, a hit player and errors by Bachman 
and Moore. Wolf again pitched winning ball, but the breaks were against 
him. 

On May 15th L. V.'s tossers wended their way to Collegeville and met 
the Ursinus nine on the diamond. Another defeat resulted, this time L. V. 
being blanked while Ursinus collected four runs. Witmer was on the mound 
and struck out but was not tight enough in the pinches. L. V.'s six hits 
were all wasted. 

Again on May 19th another defeat was registered against our nine 
by the Klein Chocolate Company team at Elizabethtown, 10 to 1. Wolf was 
hit freely by the semi-professionals and was relieved by Witmer in the sev- 
enth inning. Wolf started off in great style, allowing only a measly infield 
hit in the first four innings, but Klein clan got next to his portside slants 
after that and took advantage of their hits. Harned, doing mound du*y 
for Klein, held us to four singles. 

Two days later found the Lebanon Valley squad treating the Juniata 
aggregation rough on their diamond at Huntingdon. Thirteen safe swats 
were poled out by the local club for a total of eleven runs while Ursinus 
was fortunate enough to tally three runs off Witmer's airtight pitching. 
Horine with three hits led in the batting, while Bachman and Witmer both 
played a fine fielding game. 

Of the seven games which they have played with college teams, L. V.'s 



2 



THE CRUCIBLE 



varsity nine has won four and lost three. 

The reserves were defeated by the Lebanon High School nine at Leba- 
non on May 4, 6 to 0. Fake did the twirling for the locals and was touched 
up for eight safeties. 



Freshmen T rim Sophs 

An easy triumph was registered over the Sophomores by the Freshmen 
in the annual game of base ball on May 27th. Although making several 
misplays, the Freshmen made good use of the willow and nicked Fake's 
shoots for fifteen bingles in the seven innings which were played and made 
those fifteen swats count for eighteen runs, while the Sophs managed to 
get four weak hits off Witmer for a total of six runs. The game was as 
exciting as it was erratic, and the peculiar antics of some of the Soph 
professionals were particularly amusing and laughable. The second-year 
men gave up the ghost and the game in the seventh after the Freshmen 
had tallied nine runs in the one inning. 



To the Sophomores 

To the Sophomore Class of L. V. C, 
Greetings from your friends of '23; 
We've learned to know the great and tall. 
The short and fat, 

We know them all. 

There is Ethel who laughs and Larry who chaffs, 
And Homan of football fame: 
There is Gertrude prim, and Meta slim. 
And Anna who's true to her name. 
We know them all. 

And there's Doc, who is tall, and Adam small. 
And the orator, Jay Arnold: 
There is Joe, petite, and Sammie sweet. 
And Eflie the would-be doctor. 
We know them all. 

And there's all the rest of '22. 
From Shadel with his ideas new 
And Stabley the literary shark, 
To Johnnie Snider, who's never blue. 
We know them all. 

So here's to the class of '22: 

You've forgot us and we've forgot you; 

But nevertheless — 

Ever faithful, ever true we'll be, as brothers 
To the dear old White and Blue of L. V. C. 



BY A — FRESHIE. 



3 



Green Grow the Freshies 

CHORUS: 
Green grow the Freshies, O! 
Green grow the Freshies, O! 
The sweetest hours that e'er ~re spent 
Are spent when ye are Freshies, O! 

Now, we have here, at old L. V. 
Our full share of the creatures, O! 
And tall and thin, 
In many varied features, O! 

There's Beck the tall, and Hughs the small 
And Faust, the heavy walker, O! 
And Hohl the fat, 
Terry — the thin, 

And Reeves, who's quite a talker, O! 

Shader 's the man, who in the halls 

Shakes hands with all the ladies, O! 

While next in line 

Comes Katharine Stine, 

Star pupil of Prof. Beattie's, O! 

From out this motley verdant class 

We cannot scan each merit, O! 

We'll leave th,e rest 

Our deep respect, 

I'm sure they all deserve it, O! 

So here's a toast to "Twenty Three," 

Good wishes hale and hearty, O! 

With hopes that soon 

During next full moon, 

We'll have a hiking party, O! 

By A. "SOPH." 

Philokosmian Anniversary 

The Fifty-third Anniversary of the Philokosmian Literary Society on the 
night of May 15th was a grand success. Keim's orchestra opened the pro- 
gram with an overture of high order. The invocation by Rev. T. Berry 
Plummer, D.D., of Carlisle, was followed by the president's address on 
"Training for Leadership," delivered in a masterful manner by Huber Dale 
Strine. Mr. Strine pointed out in a logical manner the incalculable value 
of a literary training in the life of every individual, who has ambiitons* to 
succeed, to rise from the rank and file of mediocrity. The Philo chorus 
pleased the large audience with a fine rendition of Shakespeare's song from 
a Midsummer Night's Dream," entitled "Over Hill and Dale." A smart, 
ringing encore, "O Mistress Mine," answered the hearty applause of the 
first selection. 

"Orientation," the only oration of the evening, was delivered by John 
L. Berger, in a truly oratorical style. We were vividly reminded of the 
gross political injustice of a modern machine and shown the way to har- 
mony and tranquility on a firm and truly democratic basis. William I. 
Herring, senior in the Conservatory of Music, brought the first part of the 



4 



THE CRUCIBLE 



program to a close with two beautiful and finely rendered piano selections. 

The anniversary was a complete success — success in that it was dis- 
tinctly different from anything ever given by L. V. students o» a similar 
occasion, successful in that it broke down a time-worn custom and estab- 
lished in its stead a real live precedent. 

That real live precedent was a fine dramatization of Lord Dunsany's play 
— "A Night At An Inn.'' The weirdness of the setting, the subtle machi- 
nations of wit, the wonderful contrast in character portrayal, the weaknesses 
of human nature, exhilaration from the breath of success, and groans of 
mortal dismay at the hands of Doom — these impressions of that play will 
remain forever in our memories. Orientalism in all its entirety spread its 
features over us and swayed us in tlie mighty grasp of its mysticisms. And, 
above all, the warning and finally the apparition of Fate convicted us of an 
inevitable doom, somewhere — somewhere. 

To Prof. T. Bayard Beatty goes the unstinted praise of every Philo man 
for his untiring efforts in the production of the playlet. The audience 
showed its true appreciation by calling loudly for him to appear on the plat- 
form at the end of the performance. 

Following is the cast of characters: A. B. Scott-Fortesque (the Toff), 
a dilapidated gentleman; Cawley H. Strine, '20, William Jones Bill, mer- 
chant Sailor, Carroll Daugherty, '21; Albert Thomas, '21; Jacob Smith 
(Sniggers), merchant sailor, Russell O. Shadle, '22; First Priest of Klesh, 
Harold T. Lutz, '23; Second Priest of Klesh, J. I. Cretzinger, '21; Third 
Priest of Klesh, Ralph E. Boyer, '23; Klesh, Walter E. Deibler, '20. 

When the curtain had fallen on the last scene, Philo's guests departed 
to the halls of the society where amid merry laughter and light, gaysome 
music, they found refreshments and social enjoyment. 



Junior Freshman Hike 

For some time the Juniors and their class cousins of '23 had been 
planning for a joint hike. Their dream of months was realized last Mon- 
day, May seventeenth. At 7 sharp the cousins assembled on the campus, 
and a few minutes later found them strolling onward to Bachman's woods. 
They arrived just in time to watch the stars peep out. A roaring fire burst 
from a pile of logs and sticks and the real hike began, the race to and from 
the basket where the much-longed-for edibles were kept. Seated 
on logs and mother nature's carpet, around the blazing fire, 
we heard just what each class thought of the other, from Mildred Rowland 
and Birdie Renn. Miss Hummelbaugh delighted the hikers with several 
well-mastered impersonations. Every one enjoyed the H. S. club from 
L. V. M. D., who charmed their audience with clever, catchy airs. Pro- 
fessor Beatty pleased us all by telling some new jokes and ending up with 
one of his interesting readings. Our athletes, Ferd. Beck and Giggs 
Moore, gave interesting personals about their audience. With true musical 
talent Orin Farrel gave us two little love songs. We tackled Professor 
Sheldon next, and finally after much persuasion, he rose from his comfy 
log seat by the fire and in his own musical way began to sing, but alas it 
was a familiar air, and we all joined heartily in our alma mater. A large 
ring was formed around the fire, and as the merry hikers danced about the 
fire the clear night air rang with the voices of lads and lasses of '21 and '23. 
At a late hour the hikers enjoyed the stroll home, through the beautiful 
moonlight. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



5 




THE CRUCIBLE 

Vol. VIII. Annville, Pa., Thursday, June 3, 1920. No. 11. 



Editor-in-Chief 
ORIN J. FARRELL, '21 

Associates 
OLIVE E. DARLING, '21 
B. F. EMENHEISER, '21 
AMOS HAAS, '21 
MIRIAM CASSEL, '22. 



Literary 
RHODES R. STABLEY, '22 
MAE REEVES, '23 

Activities 
GEORGE O. HOHL, '23 
ETHEL LEHMAN, '22 

Alumni 

LUCILE SHENK, '23 



Atb .etics 
GUY W. MOjjRE, '21 
HAROLD LI .Z, '23 

Music 

EMMA WITMEYER, "21 
BEULAH SWARTZRAUGH, '21 

Jokes and Exchanges 
HEBER MUTCH, '23 



Business Manager 
CARROLL C. DAUGHERTY, 21 

Assistants 
P. RODNEY KREIDER. '22 - 
RAYMOND OBERHOLTZER, '23 
GASTON VANDEN BOSCHE, '23. 

Entered as second class matter, November 12, 1910, at the Post Office 
at Annville, Pa., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 per . year. Single copies, 15c each. 

Address all communications to Carroll C. Daugherty, Lebanon Valley 
College, Annville, Pa. Items for publication are solicited from students 
and alumni, and should be in the editor's hands before the second and 
fourth Friday of each month. 



Students' Evening Recital 

A recital was rendered by the students of the Conservatory of Music 
and School of Oratory Thursday evening, May 13th. Miss Ruth Hoffman 
gave an organ number. Misses Maryland Glenn, Kathryn Kratzert, Olive 
Darling, Kathryn Stein, Esther Fink, and Messrs. Meyer Herr, Russell Sha- 
de], John Cretzinger, read. Piano selections were rendered by Misses Verna 
Pell, Martha Keeney and Minerva Raab. Misses Pearl Seitz and Beulah 
Swartzbaugh and Mr. Orin Farrell gave vocal solos. 



6 T HE CRUCIBLE 

Eiirydice Concert 

The annual concert of the Eurydice Choral Club was held Thursday 
evening, April 29th, at Engle Hall. Mm. Bertyne N. Collins, soprano of 
New York, was welcomed by those who hai met her last year, and won the 
hearts of the new students, by her pleasing personality. 

"De Coppah Moon" seems to have made the biggest hit of the club's 
numbers. "Wake, Miss Luidy," another Southern melody, was enjoyed 
almost equally as well. "Morning Mood" and "Ase's Death" from "Peer 
Gynt Suite," by Grieg, showed careful training. "The Nightingale and the 
Rose" and "Goodbye Summer" were "something different." 

Mrs. Ne Collins gave the "Jewel Song" from "Faust" in her beautiful, 
artistic manner. Her second group consisted of three French songs. As 
an encore she gave "Carry Me Back To Old Virginy" in such a manner as 
she only can. "Spring" by Henschel, "The Last Hour," by Kramer, and 
"Little Wheel a Turning in My Heart," (a negro melody arranged by 
Fisher), were most enjoyable. Her imitation of the birds in "Spring" 
showed her skill as a lyric soprano. 

The cantata, "The Tale of the Bell." was rendered by Mrs. Ne Collins 
and the club. Miss Emma Witmeyer was at the organ and Miss Ruth Engle 
at the piano. Miss Mabel A. Miller deserves great credit for her splendid 
work as directress. 

After the concert an informal reception was held in Prof. Sheldon s 
studio where punc" and cakes were served. 



Senior Recitals 



Miss Myrl Saylor, mezzo-soprano, and Mr. William I. Herring, pianist 
seniors in the Conservatory of Music, gave a recital in Engle Hall Tuesday, 
May 18th. Program: ' . , 

Piano Sonata, Op. 31, No. 2 (1st movement) Beethoven 

Mr. Herring. 

Aria _ Sleep! Why Dost Thou Leave Me (Semele) . . Handel 

Bili, Eili! Kurt Schindler 

Miss Saylor. 

Piano— Nocturne, Op. 3 7, No. 2 S?°S!j 

Ballade, Op. 23 ChoDm 

Mr. Herring. 

Songs — "Bergere Legere" 

"Que ne suis-je la fongere" 

"Venez, Agreeable Printemps" . ■ 

Bergerettes of Eighteenth Century, by J. B. Wecherlm. 
Miss Saylor. 

Piano— Praeludium, Op. 10, No. 1 JI^S ^!! 

Choir de Lune.Op. 37, No. 1 Jsz! 

Polonaise No. 2 1SZ 

Mr. Herring. 

Songs _''When Love is Kind" Old English Melody 

"Shepherd, Play a Little Air" William Stickles 

"Life's Paradise" Mary Helen Brown 

Miss Saylor. 



President G. D. Gossard recently attended an educational meeting, 
held at Washington, D. C. The meeting was especially called by Commis- 
sioner of Education P. P. Claxton. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



7 



A Senior Oratorical Recital was given by Miss Myrtle Lefever, assisted 
by Miss Emma Witmeyer, a '19 graduate in organ, Thursday, May 27. 



Program: , 

Organ — Sonata, Op. 80 No. 5, Allegro Appassionato Guilmant 

Miss Witmeyer. 

The Mallet's Masterpiece Edward Peple 

Miss Lefever. 

Organ (a) The Swan Saint Saens 

(b) Caprice Ralph Kinder 

Miss Witmeyer. 

Comedy — Joint Owners in Spain Alice Brown 

Miss Lefever. 

Piece Heroique .Caesar Franck 

Miss Witmeyer. 

Selection from Evangeline Henry Longfellow, 

Miss Lefever. 



Miss R. Helena Maulfair, senior in oratory, and Miss Carrie May Wal- 
born, pianist, senior in the Conservatory of Music, gave the following pro- 



gram Tuesday evening, May 25: , 

Piano — Sonata, Op. 57 (1st Movement) ( Beethoven 

Miss Walborn. 

Reading — Mother O' Mine Alice Garland Steele 

Miss Maulfair. 

Piano — Berceuse Chopin 

The Two Larks Th. Leschetisky 

Miss Walborn. 

Reading — The Revenge Alfred Tennyson 

Miss Maulfair. 

Piano — Polichinelle Rachmaninoff 

Warum? R. Schumann 

Valse de Concert Wieniawski 

Miss Walborn. 

Reading — The Falcon ' Alfred Tennyson 

Miss Maulfair. 



Ibsen Party Given By Prof. Beatty 

Too intellectual, did you say? That's w\at somebody feared the party 
would be when Professor Beatty entertained ti:e class in English V and VII 
at his home on May the 20th. However, the person with the evil apprehen- 
sions forgot to worry as the fun of the evening progressed. 

We are sure that if the spirit of Ibsen were hovering about he would 
be much elated by the homage accorded him by English V and VII, though 
it is doubtful whether he would have been able to recognize some of his 
plays as they were charaded. Our respects Jiaving thus been paid to Ibsen, 
some very modern plays were read, to the huge enjoyment of everyone. 

Next pencils and paper were passed around. Horrors! Is this a 
camouflaged exam.? Oh no, just some very clever puzzles to show how 
smart you are. 

Then t'ae eats! Wasn't that cake good? Needless to say, everyone 
had a happy and contented feeling when finally the company took its leave 
and wended its way toward the campus. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



The Glee's "Wind Up" Season 

As usual, the Conservatory Chapel was the scene of a most ex- 
traordinary entertainment, Friday, April 23d, when the jolly Glee'rs and 
their friends were invited to a party by Professor and Mrs. Sheldon. The 
happy crowd gathered about 8:15 P. M., and being divided into groups 
of three, each was anxious to see the performance of the other. 

Well, the program started with a pantomime, and I dare say it was 
excellent, for you know they got a prize. But then, there were others — 
others who got prizes for their ability in presentation ranging from "love 
farce" to great acrobatic stunts. But this wasn't all. About the time the 
crowd thought of going home they were asked to visit Professor Sheldon's 
home. Gee! What a surprise! Those snug little tables all set, and for 
only two (couples), together with the eats placed on them, made everv 
last one wish for another such time. 

But lo! another week-end is here, and the date is now the 30th of 
the same month; and the same jolly bunch, save a slight change in the 
female appearances, was seen to leave Annville for Reading early in the 
afternoon to spend another full night together, and'' thus end the year 
successfully. And they did. 

After a short view of the city, the excitement was started, after dis- 
posing of the fair sex, by a grand rush for the Y. M. C. A., where the first 
landing, picked out the best rooms and in which their valuables were 
locked. Stine, as usual, was last to- arrive, and landed a room without a 
lock, so in order to reserve his bed for the night, a note, on which was 
written "This bed is mine," was placed rather conspicuously on the bed. 
Several of the boys, visiting his room during his absence, discovered this 
note, and a similar one on the bed opposite this note said, "This bed is» 
hers" (Herr's); so they all knew the room was taken for the night. 

No one ate lunch, hence were prepared for the grand dinner. Two 
by two the twenty-six couples came together in the grand and spacious 
lounging rooms of the large "Berkshire." "I guess they're all here, so 
we'll have a picture taken," Professor Sheldon remarked. All were ready 
for the snap. When Stine asked for Herr and finding him absent, retired 
again for another half hour, until the gentleman arrived. But the elab- 
ora' e and delicious feast awaited the crowd, so they hustled into the cozy 
panor where they were greeted with such things as grape fruit maraschino, 
celery, olives, consomme en tasse, broiled blue fish, maitre D'hotel, Parisi- 
enne potatoes, roast stuffed turkey, potato croquettes, green peas, lettuce 
and tomato salad, mayonnaise, strawberries, fancy cake, Neopolitan ice 
cream, coffee and mints, etc. 

With Professor Sheldon as toastmaster the following delightful pro- 
gram was rendered: 

Three flash lights picturing scenes on our Glee Club's trips; Accident- 
ally accidental accidents to L. V. C. G. C. 1920; Editorials; Before and 
After Concerts; A questionaire on the operetta, "Fraternally Yours," the 
Eurydice Choral Club; Impressions and expressions gathered through 
travel in interest of greater L. V. C. A public session of a Private Execu- 
tive Board Meeting of the Men's Glee Club. 

The program ended with the granting of certificates and prizes, yet 
this did not entirely end the banquet, for until wee hours in the morning 
they could be seen leaving the "halls of fame" as stray sheep of the fold. 

Although the evening was quite unpleasant out in the open, the en< 
tertainment given during the program and after, was such that everyone 
present may oft recall the banquet of L. V.'s 1919 and '20 Glee Club. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



iss Adams Entertains the Cast of Junior 



Good evening, Lady Jacobson! Is Sir Isaac well? Ah! Here is Esther 
too! Cecil will be delighted to see her. Ulrica has been expecting a call 
from Adrian. 

Just for the evening of May 14th, the Cotswolds laid aside their hatred 
for their Jewish neighbors; and, through the hospitality of Miss -Vdams 
spent a delightful evening with the family from the House Next Door Sir 
John seemed to have forgotten entirely his bitter race prejudice- for 
throughout the evening he could be observed chatting amicably with Ladv 
Jacobscn. 

A great deal of enjoyment was found in pantomiming the most im- 
pressive scenes of the play, especially as nearly evervone bad a different 
part than was originally his. Miss Adams evidently considers costuming 
an important element of the historic art; for she set each to the task of 
designing and fashioning a costume for some character of the play with 
pins and crepe paper for materials and a clothes pin for a model When 
this was done everyone partook with the greatest delight of the delicious 
refreshments served by our hostess. 

By this time the evening was rapidly advancing; and Ilaximilian 

who aside from his capacity as servant to the Jacobsons, is a baseball man 
— was beginning to think of retiring. But before the party broke up Miss 
Adams gave us, by special request, a much-appreciated treat in the form 
of several readings. Afterward the Cotswolds and Jacobsons reluctantly 
took their leave. 



Seniors Entertained By the Gossards 

Friday night, May 15th, Dr., Mrs. and Miss Minnie Gossard entertained 
the Seniors in royal fashion. After the folks of '20 had all assembled at 
the Gossard home, the fun began. The party was arranged in calendar 
style. For each month of the year there was an appropriate function 
Prizes were offered in some of the contests and races. For January the 
guests were required to make New Year's resolutions. The short month 
demanded a valentine party. March, the month of St. Patrick, was fit- 
tingly celebrated by a potato race. Everybody hunted for peanuts' in April, 
but alas! it was all an April Fool. May was of course the time for the May 
Pole dance. There was a really, truly May Pole on the porch and around 
it danced the merry people. June is the time of graduates. So those who 
were about to undergo that order 1, had to make June graduates out of corn- 
cobs and black crepe paper. August, the time of the harvest moon, called 
for a moonlight walk on the porch. September brings back the school days. 
So a country school was held. October makes us think of 'Hallowe'en. And 
sure enough, there came stalking in a ghost who called himself the Spirit of 
the Class of 1920. He told them how they had pleased and displeased them 
and what they should do after school days. November, the month of har- 
vest, was celebrated with a vegetable-guessing contest. December, of course, 
brings Christmas to mind. And there was a real Santa Claus who gave 
each one of the graduating persons a nice present for being so good. Then 
came the "Eats." They were more J :han delicious. No one will ever forget 
them. Nor will this party ever pass from the memory of the members of 



10 THE CRUCIBLE 



Senior Mirror 



Name Commonly Chief Hobby 

Called Characteristic 

Edward Allen "Ned" Seriousness Biol. Lab. 

Earl B-v?kman "Backie" Cussing Cards 

Warren Becktold .... "Bee" Silence Business 

Bessie B. Behney .... "B. B." Perseverance Studying 

John L. Berger "Berg" Inrtustriousness Nothing special 

F. D. Beidel "Dugie" Joking South Hall 

Harry Crim "Crim" Teasing Girls 

Walter Deibler . . . . . "Deib" Tardiness Pipe 

Harry Burborow .... "Durbie" Being Broke A chew 

Ruth Evans . . \ "Evans" Dignity Teaching 

Esther M. Fin?" "Es" Talking Styles 

Harvey Fishbarn .... "Fish" Silence Athletics 

Charles Frost "Jack" Reserved Books 

Solomon Hagy "Sol" Dutchness Politics 

Charles Hartman .... "Fat" Working Track 

Ruth Hoffman "Hoff" Good Nature Pipe Organ 

Mae S. Hohi "Mae" Size Autoing 

Claude Klein felter ..."Dutch" Temper Football 

Myrtle Lefes-er "Dodgie" Smile "Ted" 

Sarah M. Light "Sal". Cheerfulness Having "cases" 

Helena Maulfair . . . . "H'lena" Chatting Oratory 

Ruby McCauley "Ruby" Pleasantness French 

John McGinness "Dad" Arguing Tennis 

Ralph Mease "Measie" Good sense Chem. 

Robert Morrow "Bob" His walk Photography 

Verna Mutch "Very Much" Dignitv Math. 

Harry Ruppenthal . . . "Old Lady" Laughing Correspondence 

Myrl Savior "Myrl" Nsiveness Singing 

Jennie Sebastian .... "Jennie" Neatness Biol. 

Virginia Smith ...... "Dittie" Good humor Powdpring 

Huber Snoke "Snoke" Seriousness "The Crucible" 

Myrtle Snyder "Mvrt" Good looks Reading 

Cawley Stine "Stine" Noise Socializing 

Huber Strine "Strine" Selfconsciousness Pressing 

Eldridge Stumbaugh. . "Stummv" Flirting Eating onions 

Chester Wine "Twisted" Physique Mohawking 

Guy Yarrison "Yarry" Reticence Chem. 

Dora Zeitlin "Debbie" Kidding Dancing 



When the Fire in the Dorm Goes Out 

Oh there's times around old L. V. C. when everyone gets sore, 
And there's times when even Christians cuss a little bit or more; 
And the folks must always optimistic start to spit and spout, 
But the time you hear 'em raven's when the fire in the dorm goes out! 

You can hear old Solly roaring when the water's pure and cold, 
And what our fighting Dutchman sez! The half cannot be told; 
And the poor defenseless fireman would be stumped to sauerkraut, 
If the sweari*' gang would get him when the fire in the dorm goes out! 



THE CRUCIBLE 



11 



The French Play 

A very novel and entertaining program was presented by the students 
of the French department under the direction of Miss Emma R. Schmauk 
and Mrs. Mary C. Green in Engle Conservatory, May 19, 1920. The pro- 
gram consisted of two one scene acts. The first, Les Facheux, was, repre- 
sented by Edith Stager, Sara Garver, Ruth Hoffman, Gertrude Gingrich 
Olive Darling and Ida Bomberger. It depicted the duties, trials and inter- 
ruptions of a college girl, those common to all college students especially 
when endeavoring to prepare for an examination. 

The characters of the second pay, Le Retours des Soldats, weer E. 
Gaston Vanderbosche, Heber Mutch, Christine Happel, Ruby McCauley, 
E. C. Hastings and Esther Miller. Herein was enacted a beautiful love 
story of a young demobilized army officer upon his return home from the 
great war. Between the acts the audience was delighted by several selected 
French solos by Miss Myrl V. Saylor, accompanied upon the pipe organ by 
Miss Emma Witmeyer. Everybody present enjoyed the delightful hour 
and commended on the splendid performance of each member on the pro- 
gram. A silver offering was taken by which a neat sum was realized for 
the benefit of the French department. 



The May-Pole Dance 

The 
May Day 
Exercises were 
A fine affair, 
Gay music, shouts, 
And laughter filled the air, 
Sir Robin Hood and his brave men in green 
With pretty maids in revelry were seen, 
The Freshmen gave a dance with pleasing grace, 
The Sophomores did a minuet in measured pace. 
The fair May Queen and her attendants gay 
Were the important features of the day. 
The brilliant colors of the gowns and flowers 
Made a bright scene amid the festal bowers. 
And while the halls with visitors did throng, 
The chorus made the air resound with song. 
But that which did the gay scene most enhance, 
The crowning feature, was the May-Pole Dance. 



Scientific Club 

Wednesday, May *19th, the Scientific Club held its last meeting for 
this year. Prof. Derickson gave a most interesting as well as profitable 
illustrated lecture on "Skeletons by the Radiograph." He showed picture 
after picture of skeletons that were seen in the living animal — by the use 
of the special photographing machine. After the program ice cream and 
cake were served as a parting celebration. Then followed the business 
session in which the officers for the coming term were elected. Those chosen 
were : 



12 



THE 



CRUCIBLE 



Prof. Sheldon To Leave L. V. 

Professor E. Edwin Sheldon, for ten years head of the Conservatory 
of Music at this place, has recently asked the members of the board of 
trustees not to consider him for re-election, having only recently received a 
call to Susquehanna University at a splendid increase in salary. 

Pvofessor Sheldon came to us ten years ago from Susquehanna, where 
he taugnt for a period of seven years. 

The Conservatory of Music has rapidly grown in size and through his 
efforts the, conservatory has become one of the most widely known de- 
partment in the school. 

The Men's Glee Club, under his splendid direction has achieved great 
popularity both here and in the four corners of this State. 

Though we are sorry to lose him, we are glad that he has progressed 
sufficiently to warrant every success for him in the future. 

With him and Mrs. Sheldon go the well wishes of hosts of friends and 
/ admirers. 



Alumni Notes 

Prof. J. Paul Rupp, L. V. C. '19, has the distinction of being the 
youngest principal of a high school in the State of Ohio. Workii;- under 
him are a ?aff of thirty-six teachers. 

Prof. Paul Wagner, former principal of the L. V. Academy, has applied 
for re-eleciion to that position, having spent two years in the service of 
his country, if elected he will succeed Prof, William N. "Martin, '18, who will 
leave in August for Africa to take up missionary work. 

In June Prof. Martin will take as his bride Miss Grace Snyder, '19, 
who will accompany him to the foreign field. 

Miss Lillian Kendig, ex '17, of Santa Cruz, New Mexico, spent a short 
time in Annville renewing old acquaintances and visiting Lebanon Valley 
College. 

The engagement of Prof. George A. William, '13, professor of chem- 
istry and physics at Bethany College, Bethany, West Virginia, to Miss Lena 
Byrnes Stafford, of the Department of Education, the same place, was re- 
cently announced. 

Prof. Williams is well known here, having resided in Annville for sev- 
eral years previous to his entrance in college. He served for several years 
in the chemical department of the U. S. Army. 

Miss Stafford is a graduate of the Radford State Normal School and is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Stafford, of Mechanicsburg, Virginia. 

The marriage will probably take place in the late autumn. 



It is rumored that — 

Spess has given up hope after a period of "darkness." 

"Peggie" Weir and "Ted" spend considerable time Sunday nights in 
the dining hall "drinking." 

May Reeves intends severing connection with Lebanon Valley College 
since all-night dances are not the vogue. 

Jack Bowman has become an authority on the "potato" proposition. 

"Nig" Faust is spending his money recklessly s'eeing "America First." 

Miss Hummelbaugh turned down Berger's proposal — to annihilate 
goggles. 

Mr. Bortne'', York, Pa., mistook L. V. for an asylum for the insane 
and otherwise mentally deficient unfortunates and expects to remove 
"Mary" to more appropriate surroundings next year. 

Mrs Mary Stehman ran for doctor and got him. 

"Sol" accepted a position to teach vocal in the University of Shoneck. 



THE CRUCIBLE 13 



Math Round Table 

w i * The - 1( lZ e Z ° f ft mathem atics held their last session for this term 
Wednesday night, May 26th. An excellent program on Geometry *as pre- 
sented, and many visitors were present to profit by it. As the hour was 
growing late, the members postponed the business session till the following 
noon when they elected the following officers for the ensuing year: 

President Carroll R. Daugherty; Vice-President, Russel Bowman- 
Secretary, Miriam Cassel; Treasurer, Gaston Vanden Bosche. owman ' 



Reconciliation 

(Translated from Horace, Book 111, Ode IV) 
"While I found favor in your eyes 
And you were sweet on no other guys 
The Persan king had nothing on me, 
For I was as happy as could be." 

"Before with Chloe you fell in love 
And I was still yuor turtle-dove, 
Lydia could more envy rouse 
Than even Mars fair mortal spouse." 

/ 

"Now Thracian Chloe rules my heart; 
She plays the uke and sings her part 
For her I'd face the cruellest death 
To make the fates spare her dear breath." 

"The mutual flame of love binds me 
With Calais who lives in Thurii; 
For him I'd willingly die twice 
If the fates wouldn't spare him otherwise." 

"What do you say if we'd bind again 
Our former love with a golden chain? 
If I give up red-haired Chloe for thee 
Will the door of your heart be open to me?" 

"Though you're as fickle as he is fair 
And you're as grouchy as a bear, 
While he's serene as the stars in May, 
You're the only man that I'll love and obey." 

— A Latin Student. 



Get a 1921 "Quittie" 

A limited number of extra 1921 QUlTTAPAHILLAS are at hand for 
the first few buyers. The price is $3.45 including postage. If you want 
one of these books, don"t fail to send remittance immediately to Orin J 
Farrell, Box 283, Phillipsburg, Pa. 



14 



THE CRUCIBLE 



STYLE THAT COMMENDS YOUR 
TASTE 

Good taste is the first requisite of a good impression. Seek 
style in yonr clothes by all means — but don't mistake "frills 
and flounces" for smartness. 

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES 

pi ess style and give you poise and personality — 'they can't 
change your character, but they reflect taste and make other 
men welcome your society. Always all wool. 

Try our dependable store for your next euilt or overcoat. 

MANUFACTURERS CLOTHING CO. 

Style Headquarters — Tihe Home of Society Brand. 
725 CUMBERLAND STREET, LEBANON, PA. 



For Ei'icient Servfice Patronize 
the 

Hershey Laundry 

We are the Best Equipped. 
All work guaranteed. 
Pull Dress Work a Specialty. 

Stine and Strine 



AGENTS 



Photographs of 
Quality 
BLAZIER'S 
STUDIO 

LEBANON, PA. 
Help to Identify You. 



BOYER'S 

the best place for all kinds of FINE STATIONERY, 
BLANK BOOKS, LOOSE LEAF AND MEMO BOOKS. 

Popular 

FICTION 

Pennants' and Cushion Tops. L. V. C. Seal Jewelry. 

Kodaks and Film 

Developing and Printing. Snapshot Albums. 

Fountain Pens, Flash Lights, Toys, Games, 
Books,- Decorations. 

19 W. Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



THE CRUCIBLE 



15 



Bowman's Model 
BAKERY 

FOR QUALITY 

Bread, Cakes, Buns, 
Pies, Cream Puffs, 
Doughnuts and 
Crullers. 

Opposite the Post Office, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



J. F. APPLE CO. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Manufacturing 
Jewelers 

Class and Fraternity Pins 

RINGS, MEDALS PRIZE 
CUPS 

Also an Attractive Line of 
STOCK JEWELRY 



CHOICE 

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEARi 
GIFTS I 
"HARPEL'S" 
Kodaks and Film Pictures and Frames 



WE MAKE 

CLASS PINS AND RINGS 
Commencement Announcements 

OF QUALITY 

BASTIAN BROS. CO. 

272 BASTIAN BLDG. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



NEED A NEW TRUNK, BAG, SUIT 
CASE, TRAVELING CASE, 

LEATHER GOODS 
Bicycle and Sporting Goods? 

We carry a fine line of goods. 
PRICES RIGHT QUALITY RIGHT 

E. M. HOTTENSTEIN, 

CUMBERLAND STREET LEBANON, PA. 



16 



THE CRUCIBLE 



All American Bath 
and Barber Shop 

H. M. MONFORD, Prop. 

Eagle Hotel Building, Annville 
Penna. 

Bell Phone 

Engagements by Appointment. 

Both Phones 
ASK FOR SIMON P. FEGAN'S 

Soft Drinks 

Manufactured by Simon P. 

«, Fegan 
5 NORTH EIGHTH ST., 
LEBANON. PA. 



PALACE of SWEETS vTvt 
SUPERIOR QUALITY ONLY 



Bell Phone 
SUPERFINE CHOCOLATES, 
BON BONS, CANDY AND ICE 
CREAM 

Fresh Home-Made Candies and 

Ice Cream Daily 
Ice Cream and Candies made 
to order 



SAY IT WITH FLOWERS 

J. F. Vavrous Sons 

512 Cumberland St., 
LEBANON, PA. 



Harvey L. Seltzer 

One Price 

Clothier and Men's 
Furnisher 

"The House of Good Values" 

769 CUMBERLAND ST., 
LEBANON, PA. 



Annville National 
Bank 

of ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Capital Stock ....$100,000.00 
Surplus and Undivided 

Profits $175,253.00 



Umbrellas and 
Traveling Goods 

SPORTING GOODS 

E. J. Snavely & Co. 

"MARKET SQUARE" 

FINK'S BAKERY 

for the 

BEST BAKED PRODUCTS 
You Pay for the Articles 
QUALITY and SERVICE 
Cost You Nothing. 



"Stetson" 
Hats 



'Interwoven' 
Hose 



The Men's Shop 

in the Hershey Dept. Store at 
HERSHEY, PA. 

New Styles in Men's Wear 

are here 
while the styles are new — 
not when they are dead. 



"Hart, Schaffner 
and Marx" 
and 

"Kirschbaum" 
Clothes 



High Grade 
CHOCOLATES 

Maillard's of New York. 
Apollo and Reymer's 
Fancy Gift Packages 
A Specialty 
in y 2 , 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds. 
Various High Grade 
CONFECTIONS 
always fresh. 
The Store with the Candy with 
the snap. 

SHOTT'S 

The Home of Fine Candies. 
Bell 27-J. 127 N 9th St. 



Quality Service 
BURDAN'S 
ICE CREAM 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Pottstown, Pa. 

Reading, Pa. 

Wilmington Tel. 

Quality Service 



JACOB SARGENT 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

Ready-to-Wear Clothing 



W. R. WALTZ 
BARBER SHOP 



WEST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Costumes, Caps and Gowns 

WRITE TO 

WAAS and SON 



: ■ LEBANON VALLEY 
■ COLLEGE 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 
Five Departments 

College, Academy, Music, Oratory 
and Art 

Grants Bachelor of Arts, Science and Music Degrees. 




For information write 

REV. G. D. GOSSARD, D. D., Pres. 

ANNYILLE, PA.